Choosing the Right Exercise Machine

JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, September 2001 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Choosing the Right Exercise Machine


The value of an exercise program often has as much to do with personal preferences as physical ability. Most researchers agree that caloric expenditure is the key criterion for judging the merits of any given exercise regimen. But how do factors such as one's choice of exercise machine and exertion level influence the effectiveness of one's workout and one's ability to stick with that workout? A recent study by researchers at Dublin City University (DCU) may help activity providers determine what sort of machine workout burns calories most effectively while simultaneously encouraging adherence.

As reported in the August 2001 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the DCU study involved 19 healthy men and women, all in their twenties. The participants were put through a series of exercise tests on six popular types of machine: a rower, a cross-country ski simulator, a stair-stepper, a treadmill, a recumbent stationary bike, and a regular stationary bike. After establishing the performance maximums for each participant on each machine, the researchers conducted several submaximal tests in which the subjects were asked to exercise at three levels of perceived exertion: fairly light, somewhat hard, and hard. Factors such as heart rate, oxygen uptake, and blood lactate concentration were measured during each test. The researchers found that caloric expenditure differed significantly from machine to machine, with both male and female subjects burning more energy on the treadmill and ski simulator than on any other machine (the rower was equally effective for the women).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Choosing the Right Exercise Machine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?