Bush, Congress Face off on 2002 Funding, Policy Differences

By Whitman, Cameron | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 10, 2001 | Go to article overview

Bush, Congress Face off on 2002 Funding, Policy Differences


Whitman, Cameron, Nation's Cities Weekly


Funding next year for city priority programs could fall victim to the new fiscal realities facing Congress and the Bush administration. As things returned to normal last week in Washington after the August recess, the 13 bills that must. fund next year's federal discretionary programs have not been finalized. Only five are ready for House/Senate conference and four of these face serious obstacles. It is highly unlikely that resolution of funding issues will come before October 1, the beginning of the new fiscal year. If this occurs, Congress will have to pass several continuing resolutions to keep the government funded until final agreements are reached.

Both Congress and the administration face significant challenges in developing the 2002 appropriation bills. Future federal revenues are less than anticipated due to a weakening economy, which has resulted in a shrinking federal surplus, while increased funding demands could force dipping into the Social Security Trust Fund. The president and both parties have vowed not to do this.

It is not clear how the president's request to increase defense spending by $18 billion next year will be accommodated. Congress could decide to dip into domestic programs, look to the Social Security Trust Fund, ask the president and the Department of Defense to make oats in non-priority areas of defense spending to offset the increase, or just decide to move forward with deficit spending. There are major national interests ready to support or oppose each of these alternatives

The president has suggested that Congress can accommodate his funding requests by holding down discretionary spending to the budget cap of $661.3 billion, which would not necessitate dipping into the Social Security surplus.

Senate Democratic and Republican leaders met separately with the president early last week and offered very different approaches to addressing the changed fiscal landscape.

Senator Tom Daschle (D- S.D.), Senate majority leader, placed the burden on the president to identify where to make cuts to accommodate his funding increases. He said, "This was the president's budget. It was passed. This is the president's tax cut. It was passed. It ought to be the president's solution now that those two items have passed." In general, Democratic rhetoric attacks Bush's increased budget request as a threat to the Social Security Trust Fund.

Republicans are pushing a new stimulus package including expanded trade promotion authority for the president, passage of a bill to make the Bush 10-year tax cut permanent and a reduction in the capital gains tax from 20 to 15 percent.

Senator Trent Lott (R- Miss.), Senate minority leader, highlighted the capital gains cut in his meeting with Bush last week, but he admitted that the president "didn't embrace it." Bush has stopped short of promising not to dip into the Social Security Trust Fund to fund his priorities, but promises that all beneficiaries will get their benefits.

Senator Pete Domenici (R-N.M.), ranking minority on the Senate Budget Committee, suggested last week that spending some of the Social Security surplus might be just what's needed to stimulate the economy.

On top of their varying approaches to resolving the current fiscal challenges, the White House and Democrats and Republicans in Congress face daunting challenges to resolve policy differences. These include significant disparities in their approaches to education, Medicare, Medicaid, and campaign finance reform, as well as a Patients' Bill of Rights, a national energy policy, a prescription drug benefit for seniors, full Trade Promotion Authority for the president, a minimum wage increase with tax cuts for small businesses and a capital gains tax cut, federal assistance for faith-based charities, and increased subsidies for farmers.

Prominent policy differences to be resolved include:

Appropriations: With the 2002 fiscal year beginning on October 1, the House has passed nine of its 13 spending bills and the Senate five. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush, Congress Face off on 2002 Funding, Policy Differences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.