From the Editor's Desk

By Fahey, Michael A. | Theological Studies, September 2001 | Go to article overview

From the Editor's Desk


Fahey, Michael A., Theological Studies


Paraphrasing the lament of one of Gilbert and Sullivan's operettas, I am sometimes tempted to hum "An editor's job is not a happy one." Work load includes drudgery (proof reading), worries (statistics on subscriptions), dread (writing non-acceptance letters), and tensions (meeting deadlines). Fortunately, that is not the whole picture. I also experience notable satisfactions: seeing theology go forward, publishing research of young theologians for the first time, seeing forgotten concepts restored, and helping to unearth hidden treasures.

I rarely read a submission to the journal that does not teach me something new, and copy-editing manuscripts for this issue was no exception. Elizabeth Groppe's study on Yves Congar alerted me to the famous ecclesiologist's remarkable diary written between the ages of ten to fourteen about his experiences in World War I, now published (including his own pen sketches!) as Journal de la guerre 1914-1918. Gordon Rixon's account of Lonergan's unpublished materials on prayer increased my admiration for the integrity of his insights. The commentary and translation of Evagrius by William Harmless and Raymond Fitzgerald provided me respect for the achievement of the Desert Fathers. Felix Asiedu's account about Anselm of Canterbury's convictions regarding the status of believers who are neither Christians nor Jews elucidated for me a topic much discussed in present-day theology. Mark Massa's description of anti-Catholicism in America helped me contextualize the polemics of Paul Blanshard and other nativist thinkers. And from Robert Masson's article on analogy I felt my brain being stretched to rethink ideas first grappled with in the 1950s.

But the contribution that this time has had the most powerful personal impact on me is the "note" by Bernard Doering, emeritus professor of French literature at Notre Dame, drawn from the published correspondence between Jacques Maritain and Charles Journet. I was editing Doering's manuscript immediately following the June convention of the Catholic Theological Society of America, at which the issue of the requirement of a mandatum for American theologians was a repeated topic of conversation. The French exchange of letters seemed to have described something akin to what today some theologians are describing as the dangers of a rigid application of the mandatum procedure.

Doering combed through the frank exchange of letters dating from 1920 to 1949 by those two devoted Catholic theologians that record their pain and difficulty in accepting certain aspects of the teaching on human sexuality in marriage, especially as outlined in Pius XI's encyclical Casti connubii (1930). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From the Editor's Desk
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.