Bush Seeks Islamic Nations'support for War on Terrorism

Manila Bulletin, September 29, 2001 | Go to article overview

Bush Seeks Islamic Nations'support for War on Terrorism


Hijackers linked to Bin Laden WASHINGTON, DC (AP) - President George W. Bush is courting Islamic support for a war on terrorism as a Pakistani delegation heads for talks with Afghanistan's Taliban rulers to end the standoff over Osama bin Laden.

Bush planned to meet with King Abdullah II of Jordan on Friday to discuss how nations can hunt down terrorists.

For the first time, the FBI said Thursday that some of the 19 hijackers that made suicide attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have been linked to Bin Laden.

That revelation came with the public release of photographs of the suspected hijackers, even though authorities said they were not sure they had the suspected terrorists' real names.

"What we are currently doing is determining whether, when these individuals came to the United States, these were their real names or they changed their names for use with false identification in the United States," FBI Director Robert Mueller said. He urged anyone who recognized the men to contact the FBI.

Investigators, meanwhile, have found haunting documents that provide the most jarring insight yet into the mindset of the men who boarded the four doomed planes on Sept. 11.

Terrorists left behind texts in Arabic giving them step-by-step instructions for their suicide mission and preparing them spiritually for death, a law enforcement official said Friday.

Published accounts characterized the document as a mission guide that urged the hijackers to do such things as smile, "crave death" and "make sure no one is following you."

In Pakistan, a delegation of top religious leaders and government officials arrived in Afghanistan on Friday for talks with the Taliban, according to one of the parties involved.

The Taliban so far have refused the U.S. demand to surrender bin Laden. Pakistan is the only country with diplomatic ties to Afghanistan.

Ameer ul-Azeem, a spokesman for Pakistan's biggest religious party, Jamiat Ullema Islami, said the religious leaders _ who have cordial relations with the Taliban _ would try to persuade Afghanistan's government to hold indirect or direct talks with the United States. …

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Bush Seeks Islamic Nations'support for War on Terrorism
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