Inside & Out

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

Inside & Out


Authentic paints to light up a palace

Colonial has always been a favorite American style, and Williamsburg is the perfect place to do research.

Martin Senour Paints, a branch of Sherwin Williams, has issued a whole collection of interior and exterior latex paints from one of America's favorite living history museums.

During historic paint analysis by Colonial Williamsburg's archaeologists and architectural historians, it was discovered that traditional 18th century color palettes were peppered with bright color in addition to the softer more muted shades traditionally associated with colonial America.

Thus you can find Tucker Cupboard Orange and Raleigh Tavern Green in medium light. And Palace Supper Room Pale Yellow.

However, most of the colors in the collection are darker like Dark Cupboard Blue or muted like Palace Study Blue.

Gorgeous photos of the elegant and very colorful restored governor's palace are in the September issue of Conde Nast's House & Garden.

For other Williamsburg products, visit www.colonialwilliamsburg.org or call (800) 447-8679.

New and improved ideas for our homes

It's the time of year for home shows, places where you can get ideas and tips for decorating, fixing or remodeling. …

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