Free Web Site Hosting

By Clyde, Anne | Teacher Librarian, October 2001 | Go to article overview

Free Web Site Hosting


Clyde, Anne, Teacher Librarian


You would like to create a small web site for your school library, but you have no access to a web server and your school is unlikely to provide money for server hardware, software and a permanent connection ...

Or ... The school would like to have some school library web pages, but your own HTML skills are very limited ...

Or ... The school library would like to have a web site, but the school community is concerned about the level of financial investment required and/or nervous about the ability of the school library staff to deliver on such a project.

If any of these scenarios (or a related one) describes your own local setting, then you should be aware that there are free or low-cost ways of establishing a web site.

To be made available to the world, a web site has to be mounted on a web server -- a computer with web server software and a permanent connection to the Internet. Not all school libraries will be in a position to consider commercial web site hosting through an Internet Service Provider (ISP), particularly at the beginning of an Internet venture. If the school district or education authority does not offer web site hosting for its schools, and the school itself has no possibility of setting up a web server in the school library, then it would be worth considering free web site hosting options. This strategy would' enable the school library to establish a web presence fairly quickly. It would also help to prove to the school community (if necessary) that a school library web site could be a useful service.

If there is an educational resource center sponsored by a state department of education or by an education authority or professional organization, then this center may have a web server that will host the school library web site. Some universities or colleges provide web site hosting services for affiliated institutions or alumni.

Another possibility is that if the school or school library has web searching and e-mail access through a commercial ISP, then some web hosting space and services might already be written into the contract. Most commercial ISPs offer a certain amount of free web space as part of a standard Internet access contract, though very few of their customers actually use this space.

However, there are also web sites that offer free web site hosting space as a service. Sometimes this free space is available only to certain types of web sites -- for example, educational sites or teachers' home pages or small business sites -- while others are open to anyone who registers with the service.

The free web site hosting services usually have a number of advantages (apart from cost advantages). They often enable inexperienced webmasters to create a web page in a very short time, using forms for input of information: "Sign up for a free web site and free web-building tools and be online in minutes!" says the home page of the Myschoolonline.com service (4 May 2001). Most of these sites have page templates that webmasters can use as the basis of their pages, thus reducing the amount of work needed to develop a web page. Many of the resulting pages are quite attractive, if sometimes lacking in individuality. Some of the free services provide for a degree of "customization" of pages (for example, using the school badge or logo on each page and using the school colors for background and/or typography). The specialist sites for teachers often provide password protection, so that only students in the class and their parents can access the pages. Some also offer additional tools or services, such as a URL that is related to the name of the school, counters and guestbooks on the pages or user tracking facilities.

The Electric SchoolHouse site ("connecting parents, teachers and kids ... building communities" in a free online environment) provides web page templates, online page development tools, and web site hosting space. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Free Web Site Hosting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.