Madeleine Albright to Kick off Benedictine Speaker Series

By Broz, Joan G. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 10, 2001 | Go to article overview

Madeleine Albright to Kick off Benedictine Speaker Series


Broz, Joan G., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Joan G. Broz Daily Herald Correspondent

Benedictine University will host a diverse group of speakers this month, including a stateswoman, a child psychologist and an expert on Italians in Louisiana.

The appearances by Madeleine Albright, Dan Kindlon and Jerome Salomone are all part of the Lisle school's continuing effort to stress understanding through diversity.

"By providing a variety of speakers, we provide fodder for an educated public to make decisions," university President William Carroll said. "We try to bring as many representative positions on various topics as we can" with an eye toward being an educational resource for the community.

A look at who's coming:

Madeleine Albright

On Sunday, Madeleine Korbel Albright will be part of the university's Great Issues - Great Ideas lecture series.

Speaking at 2 p.m. in the Dan and Ada Rice Center, Albright will bring her expertise as our first female secretary of state and as the highest-ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government.

Prior to her appointment in 1997, Albright served as a permanent representative to the United Nations, a member of President Clinton's cabinet and on the National Security Council.

Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, Albright speaks and reads five languages - English, French, Czech, Russian and Polish. A naturalized American citizen and mother of three daughters, she once lived in Chicago as the young wife of a journalist.

She began her political career by serving on a school board in Washington, D.C.

Albright worked on the political campaigns of Edmund Muskie, Walter Mondale, Michael Dukakis and for the national security adviser for the Carter White House. The Wellesley College graduate completed Russian studies at Columbia University, received a Smithsonian Institute Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and earned a doctorate degree in public law and government from Columbia University.

As research professor of international affairs and director of women in foreign service at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, Albright taught classes in international affairs, U. S. and Russian foreign policy, and Central and Eastern European politics.

Dan Kindlon

When Dan Kindlon comes to Benedictine at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, it will be a little like coming home.

Kindlon, who teaches child psychology at Harvard University, will be the first person to give a public presentation at the new Kindlon Hall of Learning, which was named after his parents Joseph and Bess Kindlon.

Dan Kindlon has been on the Harvard faculty for 17 years. …

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Madeleine Albright to Kick off Benedictine Speaker Series
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