Security Personnel at Dulles Seen as Risk

By Drummond, Daniel F. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

Security Personnel at Dulles Seen as Risk


Drummond, Daniel F., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Daniel F. Drummond

More than 80 percent of the departure-gate screeners and baggage handlers at Washington Dulles International Airport are not U.S. citizens, which makes completing full background checks on them difficult, according to Kenneth M. Meade, inspector general of the Department of Transportation.

At recent congressional hearings, Mr. Meade also testified that "non-U.S. citizens without proper" immigration status by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) "were authorized to enter secured areas of Dulles."

"Say someone is from Somalia, and they may be a wonderful person, but they have just been through a war and they don't have records," said Rep. Frank R. Wolf, Virginia Republican. "How am I going to do the background check? The records are destroyed, you just can't do it." Mr. Wolf, one of several House Republicans seeking to federalize security and baggage screeners, said the public is at risk because proper background checks are not being done. He said the Justice Department should handle airport security.

He said the need for a federal takeover of airport security can be seen clearly in the Justice Department's recent finding that Argenbright Security Inc. of Atlanta had hired screeners with criminal records and did not perform proper background checks.

Argenbright, one of the nation's largest airport-security companies, provides all of the passenger security and most of the baggage handling at Dulles. It also provides security screeners for some parts of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Last year, Argenbright paid $1.5 million in fines and other costs associated with its failure to perform background checks on its employees. Between 1995 and 1998, Argenbright hired more than 1,300 untrained screeners at Philadelphia International Airport.

Argenbright officials yesterday did not return calls seeking comment.

The Senate last week unanimously approved an airport security bill that includes a provision for federalizing airport security workers. A similar bill has stalled in the House because of Republican concern about federalizing the screeners.

Rep. James P. Moran, Virginia Democrat, said the hiring of foreign nationals does not provide the proper security needed.

"It's too important of a function not to have a higher quality work force," Mr. Moran said.

Mr. Moran said he does not want anyone who can legally work in the country to be out of a job, but part of the problem is that the low pay offered by the security companies - $5.15 to $7 an hour to start - usually attracts "the lowest common denominator" of the work force who lack the skills needed for sensitive positions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Security Personnel at Dulles Seen as Risk
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.