Help Public Health System Help You

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 15, 2001 | Go to article overview

Help Public Health System Help You


Byline: Dr. Mark Rosenberg

As a pediatrician, I receive a lot of telephone calls from worried parents.

Parents call the office all day (and night) about their child's fever, cough or other signs of illness. However, few doctors were prepared for the types of telephone calls we have received in the past several weeks: parents calling about anthrax and smallpox vaccines and even a few calls inquiring about the availability of gas masks.

Our offices are not alone in receiving such calls. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta received more than 500,000 inquiries to its anthrax Web site in one week, reflecting the scope of concern.

I can't offer my patients a prescription or vaccine, but I can give them a little reassurance.

I make sure parents know about the history of smallpox and that the vaccine was discontinued. And while antibiotics might be appropriate to treat a disease such as anthrax, it is important to first diagnose the condition.

Providing antibiotics to everyone carries its own risks. Many people would have allergic reactions, and the unnecessary use could increase antibiotic resistance, making it far tougher for us to treat more common infections. As more individuals purchase antibiotics, it jeopardizes our supplies, as has been demonstrated by the purchase of antibiotics in New York City following Sept. 11.

Thus, individual actions to protect against biological or chemical attacks are counterproductive. The most patriotic thing you can do is to support public health institutions in meeting all of our needs.

The government for several years has recognized the threats of chemical and biological terrorism, and the response is being augmented as public health officials evaluate potential new threats.

In addition to CDC teams that are available to monitor infectious disease threats, the federal Office of Emergency Preparedness is prepared to coordinate efforts with local and state governments if a threat or attack occurs. Emergency workers will assess the immediate impact of an incident, determine the cause and coordinate an emergency response. Teams are prepared to respond quickly to incidents in any part of the nation, as they have in New York City.

Many physicians are unfamiliar with the diagnosis of these diseases, much less prepared to treat or refer patients. As a result, we are all preparing for the possibility of seeing patients with disorders that might represent biological or chemical diseases - a task that will become more difficult as we face the influenza season with its multitude of symptoms, some of which overlap with early signs of other diseases. As President Bush said, we are all potentially on the front line of this war.

Clearly the threat of the unfamiliar and unseen is a powerful influence on us. Feelings of powerlessness might help focus our attention on the perceptions of threats.

Yet, fear is the greatest weapon of terrorists. We cannot let fear of these unknown threats dominate our daily lives or those of our children.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Help Public Health System Help You
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.