Security at Dulles Failing

By Drummond, Daniel B. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

Security at Dulles Failing


Drummond, Daniel B., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Daniel B. Drummond

Regional members of Congress say results from a recent federal investigation of security screeners at Washington Dulles International Airport show that current security procedures are failing the travelling public.

"Its unacceptable and the system is broken, clearly," said Rep. Frank R. Wolf, Virginia Republican. "The current system is so flawed that you federalize it, you professionalize it, and do security checks in a professional way."

Over the weekend, investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Department of Transportation's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) found that seven out of 20 security screeners at Dulles - or about 35 percent - failed a pop quiz testing their knowledge of basic security procedures.

Currently, security screeners are only required to go through 12 hours of training, pass a written test, and be retested on an annual basis. Those seven persons who failed the test over the weekend were removed from their positions, the OIG said.

The FAA is also performing background-check audits at 20 major airports, including Dulles, on security screeners employed since December 2000, when stricter regulations were put in place.

The audits are being done first at airports where Atlanta-based Argenbright Security Inc., which is under Justice Department scrutiny for failing to follow FAA guidelines and hiring known criminals, operates. Argenbright was ordered to pay $1.5 million in fines and restitution in October 2000 for giving false statements to the FAA, as well as not following federal aviation-security guidelines.

Yesterday, the FAA also ordered criminal background checks be done on up to 1 million airline and airport security workers.

Argenbright provides security at both Dulles and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

In a statement, Bill Barbour, the president and CEO of Argenbright, said the preliminary findings by the OIG are typical of ongoing reviews and shows that "in the majority of cases, we have complied with aviation-security regulations."

Mr. Barbour said that it is because of the increased scrutiny on airline security in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks that federal authorities "are taking the unusual step of publishing their preliminary findings."

During the weekend spot-checks at Dulles, investigators working for the OIG arrested Thomas Brown of Herndon after he purportedly passed through a security checkpoint with a concealed pocketknife. Mr. Brown has been charged with attempting to board an aircraft with a concealed weapon, a felony. He has been detained and a preliminary hearing is scheduled for Oct.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Security at Dulles Failing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.