WAR ON TERROR: UNITED STATES: $1M TO GET BIO FIEND; Aide of CBS Chief Dan Rather Has Skin Anthrax: America Told 'Watch for Smallpox and Ebola'

The Mirror (London, England), October 19, 2001 | Go to article overview
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WAR ON TERROR: UNITED STATES: $1M TO GET BIO FIEND; Aide of CBS Chief Dan Rather Has Skin Anthrax: America Told 'Watch for Smallpox and Ebola'


Byline: ANDY LINES US Editor in New York

A MILLION-dollar reward to catch America's anthrax killers was offered yesterday as two more people were found to have the disease.

An aide to CBS news chief Dan Rather and a post worker were confirmed with the infection - two of more than 40 possible victims.

The cases were revealed as fresh evidence emerged that the outbreak is an act of terrorism.

CBS is the fourth news organisation and third TV network to be caught in the scare. Intelligence officials believe outbreaks in Florida, New York and Washington are linked.

Letters sent to two prominent figures were dated September 11 - the day of the hijackings - suggesting they were the work of the al-Qaeda network.

Last night medical chiefs added to America's fear by warning of other deadly diseases that might be in the terrorists' armoury - including smallpox and the Ebola virus. The CBS worker with anthrax first reported her illness on October 1 when she noticed facial swelling.

It is the skin version of anthrax. She is on antibiotics and is expected to recover. She opens news anchor Rather's mail in New York. Rather said: "We will not flinch."

A postal worker in Trenton, New Jersey, was confirmed as a sixth victim. The infection - again the skin version of anthrax - may have come from a letter en route to CBS.

The same strain infected an aide to NBC news anchor Tom Brokaw. A baby was treated after visiting ABC in New York with his mother.

American Media in Boca Raton, Florida, is the other news firm to be hit by the same strain.

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