Feel Trapped in a Career You Don't Want? Training Is Just the Job; PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Advertising Feature

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), October 25, 2001 | Go to article overview

Feel Trapped in a Career You Don't Want? Training Is Just the Job; PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Advertising Feature


ARE you stuck in a dead end job? Do you need a boost for your ailing career? If you're nodding your head, then developing your talents is your next move.

In today's modern world the old Latin adage, Carpe Diem - Seize the Day - has never been more apt, especially in relation to your career.

A job for life is a thing of the past and it's now up to individuals to take charge of their careers and plan for the future.

The first questions to ask are 'What do I want out of life?' and 'Is my career the most important thing, and how can I progress?' It's a common fact that new challenges promote a healthier outlook on life, and so taking control of your future and mapping your career is a positive step in the right direction.

Influencing your career can be done in many different ways such as in-house training programmes, external development seminars, night school classes or part-time degree courses.

Understanding the relevance of career management skills and realising the solution lies within your own hands is the first step on the road to a flourishing career. Gaining a structure to self manage your career and applying the dynamic technique of 'action thinking' is essential in order to achieve a personal development plan that is practical and successful.

Obtaining the skills, confidence and resources to achieve career success are key factors and there are plenty of opportunities available to help kick-start your career.

Maybe you're a secretary whose IT skills are lacking. Or a marketing person who knows their talent is wasted. Take the bull by the horns and search the local papers, libraries, colleges and Open University prospectuses for the ultimate course that will enhance your working life and drive you forward.

If your current qualifications are minimal, then why not return to night school and take up a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ)? This is one of the most popular ways to continue further education and there are many benefits in taking this path.

NVQs can help you prepare for work or help with your career development. They are achieved through the demonstration of key skills and are work-related qualifications.

Each NVQ is made up of a number of units covering a particular aspect of a job. NVQs begin at level 1 and progress to level 5 for senior management positions.

Without doubt, a qualification which proves you can do a job competently is a valuable possession and is a great advantage when it comes to career progression. However, NVQs don't just focus on the theory - practical skills are also measured. It's all about putting learning into practise. …

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