131st Congress of Correction

Corrections Today, April 2001 | Go to article overview

131st Congress of Correction


131st CONGRESS OF CORRECTION * PHILADELPHIA, PA

AUGUST 11-16, 2001

OPENING SESSION

SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2001

PHILADELPHIA MARRIOTT

GRAND BALLROOM

8:00 P.M. TO 9:30 P.M.

The Capitol Steps, the only group in Washington that attempts to be funnier than Congress, is a troupe of former Congressional staffers who travel the country satirizing the very people and places that once employed them. The troupe will perform during the Opening Session of the American Correctional Association's 131St Congress of Correction.

Three congressional staffers, Elaina Newport, Bill Strauss and Jim Aidala, formed the group in 1981 when they were asked to provide entertainment for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Christmas party. At first, the group considered staging a traditional nativity play, but instead dug into the headlines and the hot topics of the day to create new lyrics for familiar tunes. This special brand of satirical humor has played from Peoria to Pennsylvania Avenue to an ever-increasing audience with over 300 shows a year nationwide.

The Steps have been featured on three national specials for public television, most of the morning and evening network news shows and dozens of times on National Public Radio's All Things Considered.

All of the members of the cast have worked on Capitol Hill for Democrats, Republicans and politicians who sit on the fence. Thanks to the constant controversy of elected officials, there's never a shortage of material, so this is a session not to be missed.

GENERAL SESSION

MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 2001

PENNSYLVANIA CONVENTION CENTER

BALLROOM

8:15 A.M. TO 10:00 A.M.

Edward Irving Koch, former three-term mayor of New York City, will be the Keynote Speaker at the American Correctional Association's 131st Congress of Correction General Session. As the 105th mayor of his hometown, Mr. Koch served from 1978 to 1989.

Prior to being mayor, Mr. Koch served for nine years as a congressman and two years as a member of the New York City Council.

He attended City College of New York (CCNY) from 1941 to 1943. In the last year, he entered the Army where he served with the 104th Infantry Division, receiving two battle stars, and was honorably discharged with the rank of sergeant in 1946. In that year, he attended New York University Law School, receiving his bachelor of laws degree in 1948, and began to practice law immediately thereafter. In 1981, CCNY awarded Mr. Koch a bachelor of arts degree.

Currently, he is a partner in the law firm of Robinson Silverman Pearce Aronsohn & Berman. In addition to writing weekly columns for Newsday, Mr. Koch is a commentator on Bloomberg Television and writes film, book and restaurant reviews. His movie reviews appear in several papers located throughout the New York City metropolitan area, as well as on Metro Guide, a cable television channel that can be viewed on cable systems throughout the tri-state area.

Mr. Koch is the author of several books, including Mayor, 1984; Ed Koch On Everything, 1994; and I'm Not Done Yet; Remaining Relevant, (January 2000).

MAJOR SESSIONS

131ST CONGRESS OF CORRECTION * PHILADELPHIA, PA

AUGUST 11-16, 2001

Monday, August 13, 2001

MAJOR SESSION A: MODELING ETHICAL BEHAVIOR

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Running a correctional institution is, in its level of complexity, like being the CEO of a corporate conglomerate. Correctional institutions are a microcosm of our society. Professionals working in this society frequently find themselves at the crossroads of the ethical universe. Some of the issues encountered are unique to corrections and other issues are common in nearly all professions and organizations. A multi-disciplinary panel -- from inside and outside of corrections -- will explore current, news-worthy cases in corrections to gain a realistic picture of the ethical questions that arise and how sound, moral decisions are made as a response.

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