From the Editor


Roger D. Launius, Chief Historian at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), leads off the Fall 2001 issue with a study that tackles the intriguing question: to what degree was NASA's Project Apollo shaped by reconnaissance and intelligence information of the Soviet space program? In the second article, "VER!: VII Fighter Command Operations from Iwo Jima, April-August 1945," John A. Russ shows how the VII Fighter Command overcame tremendous obstacles to mount a successful very-long range escort and counterair campaign that helped to complete the destruction of Japanese air power at the close of World War II. Thomas Wildenberg's "An Eagle with Wings of Gold," details the remarkable military career of Bill Taylor who flew for the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force as well as for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps during World War II. Also, we are pleased to present Part IV--Letters L--R--of Brig. Gen. Brian S. Gunderson's series on wartime "Slanguage," defining Royal Air Force terms in American Engl ish.

The fifth article is a critical review of the newly-released feature film, Pearl Harbor, by the noted film historian Lawrence Suid. Readers will be especially interested in Dr. Suid's assessment of the subject's treatment by Hollywood over the years, the inaccuracies in depicting the Doolittle Raid, and the film's impact on Japanese audiences.

Finally, Lionel D. Alford, Jr. throws down the gauntlet in his Readers' Forum: "Opportunities and Perils in the Command of Space." Noting our growing reliance on space systems, Alford challenges the conventional wisdom of hardening space satellites rather than focusing on battlefield space. Among his proposals is that the U.S. Air Force become the Aerospace Force; he has even rewritten the lyrics to the official song!

There are book reviews on such disparate subjects as fighter aces, aircraft designers, the U.

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