CLEARVUE/eav's: Universal Themes in Literature (School Edition). (Educator's Evaluation)

By Foster, Ken L. | T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), October 2001 | Go to article overview

CLEARVUE/eav's: Universal Themes in Literature (School Edition). (Educator's Evaluation)


Foster, Ken L., T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)


This CD-ROM by CLEARVUE is about common themes that have been observed in literature over the ages. It starts with stories of ancient civilizations carried through to modern times. After a brief introduction, the material of the CD compares Odysseus and the epochal tale of the Odyssey to Arthur C. Clark's modern 2001: A Space Odyssey, pointing to similarities between Odysseus' strange journey and the strange world of Clark's science-fiction story. The narrative includes QuickTime movies in small windows that illustrate each point. The flow of the narrative and the quality of the overall seamless presentation are impressive.

Several story plots are offered by a number of different authors, with a QuickTime movie sequence or other graphic highlighting each. There are nine different topics covered: introduction; individual as hero; individual and cosmos; individual and nature; individual and society; individual and family; individual and individual; individual and self; and a summary. Whether you agree with the divisional topics or not, each topic is duly covered with quotations from poems, readings from novels, excerpts from plays in QuickTime and plenty of graphics. In the topic "individual and cosmos," the concept of creation was mentioned as a common thread among all human cultures. This is true, of course, but this topic sometimes offends members of our society today. Be assured that the topic is tactfully presented and should offend no one. However, be warned that the oppression of blacks and the topic of war is covered. Concerning war, the early notion of war as noble fighting between brave warriors is contrasted with the darker side of war, the senselessness of killing, the fear of death and the horror of combat.

The material presented is brief in its duration but rich with quotations from literary figures, such as William Shakespeare, Alfred Lloyd Tennyson, Henry David Thoreau and Edgar Allan Poe. The CD is easy to navigate; a VCR tool made stopping, starting and repeating segments easy; and a complete navigation menu is also offered, making the different topics easy to find. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CLEARVUE/eav's: Universal Themes in Literature (School Edition). (Educator's Evaluation)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.