Southern University Raises Admissions Standards with Little Fallout: But Baton Rouge Community College Experiences 70 Percent Enrollment Jump. (Baton Rouge, La)

By Dyer, Scott | Black Issues in Higher Education, October 11, 2001 | Go to article overview

Southern University Raises Admissions Standards with Little Fallout: But Baton Rouge Community College Experiences 70 Percent Enrollment Jump. (Baton Rouge, La)


Dyer, Scott, Black Issues in Higher Education


Last summer, when Southern University was poised to raise its admission standards as part of a federal desegregation settlement, school officials were bracing for a loss of 700 students -- or about 8 percent of last fall's total enrollment of 9,133.

But thanks to an intensive recruiting effort that reached into all corners of Louisiana, Southern officials were able to hold the losses to 410 for an official headcount of 8,723. And Southern University Chancellor Edward Jackson predicted that the new standards will raise the academic bar for the entire campus.

"In many ways, this is the beginning of a new Southern University," Jackson told his faculty at the beginning of this semester.

Jackson noted that, as a historically Black university, Southern has traditionally maintained an open admissions policy that accepted anyone with a high school diploma or the equivalent, regardless of their grades. Jackson conceded that the mission of the school will change under the new admissions requirements that are required by the 1994 settlement of the long-running federal lawsuit over the desegregation of Louisiana's public colleges.

For the past 121 years, Jackson says, Southern University has provided educational opportunities to people who otherwise wouldn't have had a chance to attend college, helping them to develop skills to help them succeed academically and in life. The new admissions criteria are designed to raise academic standards for the school, but they will force academically disadvantaged students to turn elsewhere for help.

Beginning this fall, applicants to Southern University must have a 2.2 grade-point average on a 4.0 grade scale in high school, or achieve a score of 17 out of a possible 36 on the ACT or 830 out of a possible 1,600 on the SAT.

In most cases, Jackson says students who fail to meet Southern University's new admission standards will turn to the state's fledgling community college system for their first two years of college. The state's community colleges all have open admissions.

"Hopefully, the students who were displaced by their effort will make the transition from community colleges to four-year colleges when they finish," Jackson says.

Jackson also acknowledged that newly created community colleges are attracting hundreds of other students who might never have gone to college, and who may someday wind up transferring to Southern University and other four-year schools.

"More people are entering higher education, and that's what we wanted," Jackson says. For example, at Baton Rouge Community College -- where many displaced Southern applicants are referred -- enrollment is up 70 percent this fall, increasing to 4,298 from 2,577. …

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