Search for Quality Counseling Leads to Career in Psychology

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 20, 2001 | Go to article overview

Search for Quality Counseling Leads to Career in Psychology


Byline: Kim Mikus

Judy Kaplan's rocky marriage and difficulties in finding quality counseling drove her to her current career in psychology, specializing in marital and family therapy.

The Barrington marital therapist is dedicated to helping others turn their lives around. Her practice is at 525 W. Old Northwest Hwy.

Now in her fifth year in business, she says the holidays are a stressful time for many families. She is devoted to helping clients eliminate difficulties with family members and teaching them to view situations differently and more positively. The Sept. 11 attacks have caused additional stress for some families, which she also addresses.

Using her background in the corporate world, Kaplan also offers executive coaching services.

Raised in upstate New York, Kaplan attended Ithaca College and Ohio State University. She began her career on Wall Street for an investment-banking firm as a security analyst for the railroad industry.

Her marriage brought her to the Northwest suburbs where she secured a position with Motorola Inc. as an International finance project manager.

After 23 years of marriage, she and her husband began to experience difficulties. They sought therapist after therapist to try to help work through the problems and understand what was going wrong. "Nobody seemed to be able to provide what we needed," she said.

That was when, at the age of 46, she decided to return to school to learn what was wrong and get it right. She attended Northwestern University and the Family Institute as a full-time student from 1994 to 1996. She graduated with a master's degree in psychology and a burning ambition to assist other people struggling with issues around midlife challenges like she experienced. Kaplan's marriage ended in 1999.

In working with other couples, Kaplan attempts to give feedback as well as strategies to help them with skill development. "I want to see people turn their circumstances around," she said.

Kaplan's children may follow in her footsteps.

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