How Many Commentators Can You Identify?

By Klotzer, Charles L. | St. Louis Journalism Review, November 2001 | Go to article overview

How Many Commentators Can You Identify?


Klotzer, Charles L., St. Louis Journalism Review


Nearly on a daily basis, the public is exposed to the wise counsel of commentators on many radio and television channels. Hosts offer interviews or roundtable discussions on topics of general concern, usually dealing with economic, political, social and, now, military developments. Affiliation of these commentators is always identified which offers listeners the opportunity to judge the ideological bent of the speaker ... but only if you are informed about the background of that affiliation.

Most of us are not.

We don't have The time and/or resources to check up on all the talking heads. Moreover, few of us are engaged in original research to determine independently, the merits of most issues. All we know comes from the media, that means all we know is always second hand if not third hand; Thus clearly identifying the sources which hope to shape our opinions is a prerequisite for listeners.

Following is limited, partial listing of such sources. Omitted here are groups from, the lunatic fringe, radical religious groups favoring violence, racist, conspirational, xenophobic, anti-Semitic, Neonazis and other extremist groups.

Included are right-wing, some of them far right, which nevertheless have become acceptable to the main stream of the American public in recent years. They deserve to be-most will probably welcome it-identified.

At the end we list some of the key spokespersons of the right-wing persuasion, leaders who "shape policy through their intellectual labor. Who create consensus or coalition through their networking or serving as movement gatekeepers."

This listing was culled from the Summer 2001 issue of The Public Eye, a quarterly publication by the Political Research Association. (Phone 617-666-5300, or e-mail www.publiceye.org) PRA is an invaluable source of research for promoting progressive and democratic issues.

For additional information look up the PRA website and of other organizations which offer a wealth of research on these groups and individuals.

Accuracy In Academia

Reactionary watchdog group fighting perceived liberal bias in academia. Run by Reed Irvine. Publishes Campus Report. See Accuracy in Media.

Accuracy in Media

Reactionary watchdog group fighting perceived liberal bias in the media. Run by Heed Irvine. Publishes AIM Report. See Accuracy in Academia.

American Center for Law & Justice

Legal action in support of Christian principles. Founded by Pat Robertson in 1990. Headed by Jay Sekulow.

American Civil Rights institute

Founded by Ward Connerly in 1997, ACRI sues encoded language to oppose affirmative action. Connerly and ACRI led the Preposition 209 effort in California, which dismantled affirmative action programs in the state.

American Conservative Union

Central clearinghouse for networking conservatives loyal to the Did Right "Tall Wing of the Republican Party.

American Council on Science & Health

Challenges strict environmental regulations.

American Family Association

Specializes in leading corporate boycotts. The AFAs main interests are lighting pornography, depictions of sexuality, and positive portrayals of gays

in art and media.

American Immigration Control Foundation

Opposes "pro-alien special interest groups" by working "to counter the well-heeled propaganda campaign of anti-American special interests."

American Legislative Exchange Council

An extremely influential think-tank and network that mobilizes and trains conservative state legislators, and provides drafts of proposed state legislation.

American Life League. Inc.

Opposes abortion rights. Publishes communique, a newsletter prepared by Judith A. Brown.

American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family & Property

Global network promotes a return In Catholic patriarchal oligarchy. …

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