Get into the Spirit with Rudolph Ramble, Donner Dash

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 26, 2001 | Go to article overview

Get into the Spirit with Rudolph Ramble, Donner Dash


Byline: Dick Weisz

Runners can kick off the holidays with the Fleet Feet Rudolph Ramble 8K Run and Walk on Dec. 9 in Chicago.

The run and walk starts at 9 a.m. at 2500 N. Cannon Drive, just north of Fullerton Avenue in Lincoln Park and across from The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum.

The Donner Dash for children ages 2 to 14 is at 10 a.m., followed by the awards ceremony and a raffle, with plenty of treats. All participants will get a long-sleeve T-shirt and a goody bag.

As part of the registration fee, the Ramble will be accepting new toys (valued at $10 or more) on behalf of the Starlight Children's Foundation Midwest, which benefits youngsters with serious illnesses.

At a tent on-site, Santa Claus and his helpers from the U.S. Postal Service will provide official postal stationery for the kids at the event to write a letter to Santa. Also, holiday stamps and other mailing items will be for sale. After the event, Santa and his "sleigh" (a decorated post office truck) will take the letters and toys off for distribution.

Register online at www.caprievents.com. Or drop off your application and toy at either Fleet Feet Sports store, 210 W. North Ave. or 4555 N. Lincoln Ave., now though Dec. 6. There will also be registration and packet pick-up on Dec. 7 and 8 at the North Avenue location.

Race-morning registration is from 7 to 8:45 a.m. near the starting point. Only cash will be accepted on race day. The fee for the 8K Run and Walk is $20 in advance, $25 on race day. The Donner Dash is $12 in advance, $15 on race day.

For details, call Fleet Feet Sports at (312) 587-3338; Capri Events at (773) 404-2372, or the Eventors at (312) 944-6667.

8K race in Gilberts

The 2001 Cross Country Challenge is at 10 a.m. Dec. 2 at Indian Hills Farm in Northwest suburban Gilberts.

The course goes through areas of damp marshes, steep hills, open fields, mud and even manure. There will be changing rooms and toilets, but no showers.

"This year we've redesigned the course to have possibly an even harder running challenge than you had last year," said Jim Brimm, race director.

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