United States Civil War. (Bibliography)

By Hall, Mitchell | Michigan Historical Review, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

United States Civil War. (Bibliography)


Hall, Mitchell, Michigan Historical Review


The American Civil War stands as the great dividing point in United States history. Few events rival its historical significance or ongoing interest among both scholars and the general public. For our readers who would like a greater understanding of this pivotal time, the Michigan Historical Review asked historians who research and write in that field to list those books that they thought were the most significant in relating the history of the Civil War. The following lists reflect their responses in three categories: the most important monographs, the best surveys, and those with the greatest appeal to the general public. Among the monographs, David Donald's Lincoln and Philip Paludan's A People's Contest received the most votes. James McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom and Bruce Catton's The Army of the Potomac respectively headed the Survey and General categories.

Monographs

Castel, Albert. Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1992.

Clinton, Catherine and Nina Silber, eds. Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Davis, William C. Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.

Donald, David. Lincoln. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

Faust, Drew Gilpin. Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Fredrickson, George. The Inner Civil War. Northern Intellectuals and the Crisis of the Union. New York: Harper & Row, 1965.

Freeman, Douglas Southall. R. E. Lee: A Biography. New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1934-35.

Gallagher, Gary. The Confederate War. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.

Grant, Ulysses S. Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant. New York: C. L. Webster & Co., 1885-86.

Hattaway, Herman and Archer Jones. How the North Won: A Miliary History of the Civil War. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983.

Litwack, Leon. Been in the Storm So Long: The Aftermath of Slavery. New York: Knopf, 1979.

McFeely, William. Grant: A Biography. New York: Norton, 1981.

McPherson, James. For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

McPherson, James and William Cooper, Jr., eds. Writing the Civil War: The Quest to Understand. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1998.

McWhiney, Grady and Perry Jamieson. Attack and Die: Civil War Military Tactics and the Southern Heritage. University, AL: University of Alabama Press, 1982.

Nevins, Allan. Ordeal of the Union. 2 volumes. New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1947.

Paludan, Philip. "A People's Contest": The Union and Civil War, 1861-1865. …

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