Michigan History. (Bibliography)

By Hall, Mitchell | Michigan Historical Review, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

Michigan History. (Bibliography)


Hall, Mitchell, Michigan Historical Review


The history of the state of Michigan is, of course, the primary focus of the Michigan Historical Review. As I turn over my book review editor responsibilities to Dr. Timothy O'Neil, I thought it would be appropriate to conclude this series of bibliographies by providing readers with a select list of works on Michigan history. To evaluate the current state of scholarship on this topic, the Michigan Historical Review asked historical scholars to list those books they thought were the most significant in relating the history of Michigan. The following three lists reflect their responses: the most important monographs, the best surveys, and those books with the greatest appeal to the general public.

Among the monographs, Sidney Fine's Frank Murphy: The Detroit Years received the most votes, followed by Jeremy Kilar's Michigan's Lumbertowns, Steve Babson's Working Detroit, and another Sidney Fine book, Sit-Down. Among the surveys, Willis Dunbar and George May's Michigan: A History of the Wolverine State was the popular choice. Two Bruce Catton works, Waiting for the Morning Train and Michigan: A History, headed the general category.

Monographs

Babson, Steve. Building the Union: Skilled Workers and Anglo-Gaelic Immigrants in the Rise of the UAW. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1991.

Babson, Steve. Working Detroit: The Making of a Union Town. New York: Adama Books, 1984.

Barnard, John. Walter Reuther and the Rise of the Auto Workers. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.

Berthelot, Helen W. Win Some, Lose Some: G. Mennen Williams and the New Democrats. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1995.

Boyle, Kevin. The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, 1945-1968. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1995.

Capeci, Dominic, Jr., and Martha Wilkerson. Layered Violence: The Detroit Rioters of 1943. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991.

Clive, Alan. State of War: Michigan in World War lI. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1979.

Edsforth, Ronald. Class Conflict and Cultural Consensus: The Making of a Mass Consumer Society in Flint, Michigan. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1987.

Fine, Sidney. Frank Murphy. Vol. 1, The Detroit Years. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1975.

--. Frank Murphy. Vol. 2, The New Deal Years. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979.

--. Sit-Down: The General Motors Strike of 1936-1937. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1969.

--. Violence in the Model City: The Cavanagh Administration, Race Relations, and the Detroit Riot of 1967. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1989.

Gray, Susan. The Yankee West: Community Life on the Michigan Frontier. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Holli, Melvin G. Reform in Detroit: Hazen S. Pingree and Urban Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969.

Johnson, Christopher. Maurice Sugar: Law, Labor, and the Left in Detroit 1912-1950. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1988.

Karamanski, Theodore. Deep Woods Frontier: A History of Logging in Northern Michigan. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1989.

Katzman, David. Before the Ghetto: Black Detroit in the Nineteenth Century. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1973.

Kilar, Jeremy. Michigan's Lumbertowns: Lumbermen and Laborers in Saginaw, Bay City, and Muskegon, 1870-1905. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990.

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