Editor's Page

Michigan Historical Review, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview
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Sad news arrived after the Fall 1999 issue had gone to press. Paul Keve, whose article on the Detroit House of Correction led off the issue, died on 21 October 1999. A lifelong advocate of more humane treatment of lawbreakers, Mr. Keve had served as acting commissioner of corrections for the state of Delaware, as commissioner of corrections for Minnesota, and as professor of criminal justice at Virginia Commonwealth University. Thus his publications, which included numerous books, reflected the dual perspective of a scholar and a reform-minded administrator. His enthusiasm for his subject was infectious and evident as he prepared the article on the Detroit House of Correction for publication. I regret that he did not live long enough to see it in print, but readers of the Review can be grateful for his work and can see his humane concerns in his writing.

Professor Keve's article had a history that I neglected to acknowledge in the fall issue. A much shorter version appeared as Paul W. Keve, "The House of Correction that Detroit Built," The Court Legacy 7, no. 1 (April 1999): 1-5. The Court Legacy is published by the Historical Society for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, Theodore Levin U.S. Courthouse, Detroit, Michigan 48226. The Historical Society had helped to fund Professor Keve's research, and I am most grateful for permission to republish portions of the original piece in the longer narrative that appeared in the Michigan Historical Review.

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