You Love 'Em . . .but Just Who Are the Lost Prophets?; New Rockers Trounce Established Welsh Acts in Our Poll

Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales), December 16, 2001 | Go to article overview

You Love 'Em . . .but Just Who Are the Lost Prophets?; New Rockers Trounce Established Welsh Acts in Our Poll


Byline: BY RICHARD EVANS

IT'S the moment you've been waiting for pop-pickers - it's time to reveal the Welsh Single of the Year, as voted for by you.

Last week we asked you to choose your favourite A-side released by a Welsh band in 2001 - and after seven nail-biting days of phone-votes from tons of our readers, we now have a winner.

The Wales on Sunday Welsh Single of the Year 2001 is - Shinobi v Dragon Ninja by Lost Prophets.

The Pontypridd six-piece have beaten off stiff competition from big names like the Stereophonics and the Manics to comfortably scoop the top spot.

Their winning single was released back in August, so it's a tune that must have stuck in your heads for a long time.

Despite polling more than twice the votes of the number two single - Stood on Gold by Gorky's Zygotic Mynci - the Lost Prophets are still an unknown quantity to most people. So who are these shadowy Ponty lads who have fought a David v Goliath battle with the biggest names in Welsh pop - and won?

To answer that question, we've compiled our own Bluffer's Guide to Lost Prophets.

Read on and learn. . .

Stereos lose. . . and win YOU voted Lost Prophets your top Welsh single of the year - but in the pop charts, Shinobi v Ninja only got to number 41.

The best-selling single on our shortlist of 10 was by the Stereophonics.

Handbags and Gladrags - the Cwmaman boys' cover of a Rod Stewart tune - was at time of going to press at number four in the charts. Of course, the new chart is out today and the Phonics might edge even higher in the charts.

But even if they don't, they can still be pleased that they've got the first AND the second best selling singles in our shortlist - Have a Nice Day got to number five.

SOME MIGHTY PROPHET-ABLE INFORMATION SO WHO ARE THESE LOST PROPHETS? They're six mates from the Pontypridd area, all in their early 20s, a mix of school friends and pals from local bands who got together three years ago and became the Lost Prophets.

WHY HAVEN'T I HEARD OF THEM? It depends how keen you are on rap/metal crossover - and if you don't know what that means, then the Lost Prophets are probably not for you. But, as our Single of the Year poll proved, the kids are loving it.

WHAT DO THEY SOUND LIKE? Imagine the mellow, acoustic-led melancholy pop of Travis, Coldplay or David Gray - well, the Lost Prophets sound nothing like that. Think more of shouty US groups like Limp Bizkit and Linkin Park - take an ounce of thrash metal, add a heaped tablespoon of gangsta rap and lightly garnish with a catchy chorus.

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You Love 'Em . . .but Just Who Are the Lost Prophets?; New Rockers Trounce Established Welsh Acts in Our Poll
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