Job Satisfaction Valued over Salary

By Causey, Mike | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

Job Satisfaction Valued over Salary


Causey, Mike, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Mike Causey

Money isn't everything. That's a healthy thought.

To say salary is the least-important aspect of your job, however, indicates you are on a very strict diet, don't date much or live in a climate-controlled pod in your parent's basement.

You don't care what you're paid? Says who?

According to some of the nation's finest think tanks and research organizations, workers prioritize job satisfaction over salary.

That finding is OK as long as important people, like those who compensate you, don't pay too much attention to such claims. Unfortunately, it is being talked about by some of the government's top officials - all of whom make six-figure salaries.

One of the popular new job satisfaction studies comes from the Corporate Leadership Council. It indicates that salary - the thing you use to pay your rent, buy your groceries and afford your kids' shoes - is less important than having training opportunities, feeling good about your work, working with a great boss and just about everything else.

If your boss believes that and disregards data showing federal workers still trail the private sector by up to 30 percent in salary, feds will be in for another annual series of skimpy, Clintonlike pay raises.

Question: Who says money doesn't count? Are they asking Brad Pitt and Julia Roberts, who've got theirs and can now concentrate on art, or Joe the GS 7, who likes Cleveland Park but has to live 110 minutes from his office?

If the money-doesn't-count crowd wins the day, your next pay raise will come in the form of an overcrowded day care center (or you with no kids), a supply of bottled water, two new bike racks out front and new suggestion boxes on every floor.

HIGH-TECH PAY

Last January, 30,000 federal computer specialists, engineers and scientists in grades 7 through 12 got pay raises, which (with the January 2001 adjustment) were worth 7 to 30 percent.

At the time the raises were OK'd, the economy was booming and private firms were luring top talent with the promise of moderate salaries and big-potential stock options. …

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