Cures for the Privileged? Government Officials Receive Anthrax Treatment Prior to Post Office Employees. (Washington Report)

By Hughes, Alan | Black Enterprise, January 2002 | Go to article overview
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Cures for the Privileged? Government Officials Receive Anthrax Treatment Prior to Post Office Employees. (Washington Report)


Hughes, Alan, Black Enterprise


Over the past few months or so, the hazards of handling mail for a living have increased exponentially. And while safety measures are being put in place in the Senate and other government offices, many are questioning whether mailroom and post office employees in Washington, D.C.--many of whom are African American--are receiving a similar degree of protection.

The Bush administration was recently criticized for waiting three days after the discovery of the anthrax-laden letter addressed to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle before ordering testing at the central postal facility for the nation's capital. Anthrax is spread by spores, and without quick antibiotic treatment, more than 80% of people who contract the severe inhalation form of the condition die. Postal workers Thomas Morris Jr. and Joseph Curseen Jr. died from anthrax exposure in late October. Several other postal employees remain hospitalized. As of early November, four deaths were attributed to the bacteria.

Dr. Ron Walters, distinguished leadership scholar and professor of political sciences at the University of Maryland, believes this case demonstrated the difference between white-collar Washington and the blue-collar District of Columbia. "It was botched, and would seem to have the smell of racism because 80% of the people who work in [the postal office in the Brentwood section of Washington] were African American," he says. "There was no thought given to the fact that [postal workers] should be immediately tested because all the focus went to the Senate and its staff."

Since the incidents, postal officials announced plans to purchase electron-beam devices to sanitize letters and packages. The equipment will be used first in the nation's capital, where the anthrax scare has spread from mail centers for Congress and the White House to the Supreme Court and the CIA.

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Cures for the Privileged? Government Officials Receive Anthrax Treatment Prior to Post Office Employees. (Washington Report)
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