No Tears for Westminster Deputy Who Owes [Pounds Sterling]27m; David Weeks Is the Forgotten Man of the Westminster Council Homes-for-Votes Scandal but, as Leader Dame Shirley Porter's Then Deputy, He Also Faces an Extremely Large Bill. Colin Freeman Reports

By Freeman, Colin | The Evening Standard (London, England), December 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

No Tears for Westminster Deputy Who Owes [Pounds Sterling]27m; David Weeks Is the Forgotten Man of the Westminster Council Homes-for-Votes Scandal but, as Leader Dame Shirley Porter's Then Deputy, He Also Faces an Extremely Large Bill. Colin Freeman Reports


Freeman, Colin, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: COLIN FREEMAN

THE nondescript Pimlico flat looks just right for someone who wants to stay anonymous. The phone number is ex-directory and the only sign of life is a Christmas card and Harrods brochure waiting outside.

Unfortunately, its occupant has no way of escaping his high-profile past as another, rather less festive, delivery will remind him shortly.

Addressed in person to "Mr David Weeks", it will be a demand from Westminster council for the sum of [pound]27 million.

Weeks, 55, is the other figure in the Westminster homes-for-votes scandal who, as Dame Shirley Porter's number two, found himself once again facing a huge personal surcharge last week after the House of Lords reaffirmed their guilt in the affair.

Since then - as ever - Dame Shirley's opinion on the matter has been well aired. The verdict was "appalling" she said, announcing her intention to appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. By contrast, Weeks has remained silent. So who exactly is he - and what happens to him now?

Finding out isn't easy. His Tory successors will not talk about him, while the most that Labour rivals can remember is that he retired a "broken man" from the council in 1998.

One thing is certain - he and his coaccused could hardly be more different.

If Dame Shirley was the town hall equivalent of Margaret Thatcher, her deputy - who succeeded her as leader - was its John Major. …

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No Tears for Westminster Deputy Who Owes [Pounds Sterling]27m; David Weeks Is the Forgotten Man of the Westminster Council Homes-for-Votes Scandal but, as Leader Dame Shirley Porter's Then Deputy, He Also Faces an Extremely Large Bill. Colin Freeman Reports
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