Men and Sex: Christmas Psychology What His Gift Means; There's Nothing Quite like a Big Old Pressie to Keep Us Girlies Happy. but What Exactly Does His Gift - and the Price Tag - Say about Your Relationship?

The Mirror (London, England), December 22, 2001 | Go to article overview

Men and Sex: Christmas Psychology What His Gift Means; There's Nothing Quite like a Big Old Pressie to Keep Us Girlies Happy. but What Exactly Does His Gift - and the Price Tag - Say about Your Relationship?


Byline: Lucile Howe

Consumer psychologist Jim Goudie, from the University of Northumbria, says, `I'm always very suspicious when I see people spending large amounts of money on each other because it's usually compensation for a lack of emotional expression in the relationship, or a sign of guilt.

`Freud thought that women want to marry their dads and men want to marry their mums - a scary thought - but watch out for presents that look like your partner wants to turn you into a mother figure. You'll be making Christmas dinner - then Sunday roasts - forever after!'

If he buys you...

Music CDs If it's an artist you both like it means he enjoys sharing time and interests with you and wants to strengthen the bond already there. If it's the Bridget Jones soundtrack or Robbie's swing compilation then it's a positive sign that he's considered your tastes carefully, and recognises your individuality. It's a healthy relationship when you can stand in front of the mirror singing into a hairbrush and he promises not to laugh. However, if the sparkly wrapping paper hides a Barry Manilow CD, forget it - he can Copacabana on his tod.

Lingerie or expensive perfume He's very aware of the sexual differences in the relationship. …

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Men and Sex: Christmas Psychology What His Gift Means; There's Nothing Quite like a Big Old Pressie to Keep Us Girlies Happy. but What Exactly Does His Gift - and the Price Tag - Say about Your Relationship?
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