No Need to Grieve Alone; Advertising Feature Coping with Bereavement

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), December 24, 2001 | Go to article overview

No Need to Grieve Alone; Advertising Feature Coping with Bereavement


THE death of a loved one is a horribly traumatic experience.

It can leave you feeling like you're caught up in a whirlwind of intense emotions so extreme that it's hard not to feel confused, isolated and completely out of control. Everything seems meaningless and somehow detached.

Few people are lucky enough to go through life without having to face the death of a loved one.

Death is, after all, part of life. Bereavement is always a very personal, painful experience.

Psychologists agree that two types of bereavement can be identified: Uncomplicated, normal or healthy bereavement, and complicated, abnormal or unhealthy bereavement.

People going through healthy bereavement are still likely to show symptoms of anxiety and depression - even physiological changes which reduce the body's ability to fight off disease.

Others feel guilt because they seemingly feel no pain, thinking themselves unloving or abnormal - though this is not the case.

With complicated bereavement it is important to note that there is no standard behaviour - there are warning signs which can be identified and which could necessitate the services of a professional counsellor.

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No Need to Grieve Alone; Advertising Feature Coping with Bereavement
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