Snack Craving May Predict Career Choice. (Behavior)

USA TODAY, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Snack Craving May Predict Career Choice. (Behavior)


The average American will have three to five careers, 10 to 12 jobs. and will hold each one for an average of 3.5 years throughout his or her lifetime, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Does this sound familiar? Are you still struggling to find the ideal career?

Finding your dream job may be as simple as opening that bag of potato chips in your kitchen cupboard. A study conducted by Alan Hirsch. neurological director of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation. Chicago, found that job satisfaction is correlated to your favorite savory snack. "A person's job selection reflects his essential essence and his personality," he maintains. "Food choices--like selection of clothing, movies, and spouses---can provide insight in personality and character structure. Thus, the typical personality traits associated with savory snack preferences can be used to help predict occupational choices, because a person's job selection also reflects his essential essence and his personality."

Because potato chip lovers are ambitious and successful, it is not surprising that lawyers and CEOs prefer them. If you're itching for a job change, don't waste time taking interest tests to determine your preferred career. Use Hirsch's theory to link your favorite snack food and personality profile to a career and discover the ultimate in job snack-isfaction, Each craving is analyzed below and followed by the occupations that he says fits the description:

People who choose potato chips to satisfy their snacking urges have high expectations not only for themselves, but for those around them. Competitive. they usually come out on top in business, sports, and social situations. (Lawyer, tennis pro, police officer, CEO)

Lively and energetic, those who prefer pretzels seek novelty and easily become bored by routine. They are excited by any challenge, whether it is at work, in sports, or at home. They make decisions based on intuition and emotion, especially in romantic relationships. (Firefighter. journalist, flight attendant, veterinarian, pediatrician)

Fans of the tortilla chip are perfectionists. This trait extends beyond their actions to the community at large. …

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