The Effects of a Parent Coach on Parents' Acquisition and Implementation of Parenting Skills

By Marchant, Michelle; Young, K. Richard | Education & Treatment of Children, August 2001 | Go to article overview

The Effects of a Parent Coach on Parents' Acquisition and Implementation of Parenting Skills


Marchant, Michelle, Young, K. Richard, Education & Treatment of Children


Abstract

This project addressed the need for research in teaching positive parenting skills to parents of children who are noncompliant. Participants in this study were four parents and their noncompliant children. A parent coach assisted each parent in acquiring and implementing the positive parenting skills, which included delivering appropriate "please do" instructions, pre-teaching target skills, delivering "effective praise," implementing "corrective teaching," using self-monitoring strategies, and reinforcing the child's behavior. The parents delivered the instructions to their children in their homes daily. This study measured (a) the parents' learning of the parenting skills and self-management procedures, (b) the parents' implementation and maintenance of the parenting skills and self-management procedures, and (c) the effects of the parents' use of these skills on their children's compliant behavior. A multiple-probe design across parents was used to evaluate the implementation of the parent training and use of the skills. The parents successfully learned and used the skills-based teaching techniques, the reward system, and the self-monitoring strategies. child compliance with parental instruction improved. In addition, the parents' and children's opinions were evaluated to verify the importance of the skills and teaching procedures as a measure of social validity.

Researchers have reported antisocial behavior as the most prevalent of all childhood behavior problems, affecting 3% to 9% of school-aged children in the United States (Bourn, 1993; Hester & Kaiser, 1998; Loeber & Schmaling, 1985; Sprague & Walker, 2000; Walker, Colvin, & Ramsey, 1995). Children who enter school with limited social skills commonly struggle with peer and teacher relationships, and over time the failure to adjust in these areas is correlated with delinquent and criminal behavior as they approach their teenage and adult years (Hester & Kaiser, 1998; Southam-Gerow & Kendall, 1997; Walker et al., 1995). Sprague and Walker (2000) referred to antisocial behavior as a general response class that includes behavior such as noncompliance, aggression, and bullying. It has been suggested that noncompliance is the "keystone" behavior that gradually leads to antisocial acts (Loeber & Schmaling, 1985). Factors that contribute to antisocial behavior in children include divorce, poverty, abuse, socioeconomic i ssues, and child-rearing practices (Hester & Kaiser, 1998; Walker, 1997). However, the predominant variables are parenting practices and coercive family interactions (Patterson, DeBaryshe, & Ramsey, 1989; Patterson, Reid, & Dishion, 1992; Walker et al., 1995). Specifically, coercive parenting practices account for 30% to 40% of the variance in children's levels of antisocial behavior (Patterson et al., 1989; Tolan & McKay, 1996; Walker et al., 1995).

A child who is labeled "antisocial" obviously lacks what society defines as prosocial behavior or social skills. According to the social skills literature, professionals, not parents, typically teach prosocial behaviors to aberrant children (Budd, 1983; Walker et al., 1995). Schools in the United States frequently include programs that attempt to develop social skills in children (Verduyn, Lord, & Forrest, 1990; Zaragoya, Vaughn, & McIntosh, 1991); however, because parent and home conditions are critical to the development of acceptable social behavior, parents must be partners with personnel from schools and other agencies who share a common goal of intervening with antisocial behavior problems (Walker et al., 1995). Almost 20 years ago, Budd (1983) asserted that noticeably absent from the social skills literature was the consideration of parents in the role of teaching social skills to their children, such research is still lacking. Considering that the origins of behavior problems are associated with condi tions in the home and community, it seems logical that the parents become involved in altering their children's behavior.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Effects of a Parent Coach on Parents' Acquisition and Implementation of Parenting Skills
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.