Arab History, Arab Hypocrisy

By Rodman, David | Midstream, November 2001 | Go to article overview

Arab History, Arab Hypocrisy


Rodman, David, Midstream


It's sadly ironic, but not really surprising, that the summer 2001 United Nations conference on racism in Durban, South Africa, turned into a racist conference -- indeed, a racist farce. By attempting to delegitimize Jewish nationalism and the Jewish state through vicious and preposterous condemnations, the Arabs (and their sycophants around the word) once again hijacked an international forum in a blatant effort to blot out the Jewish people's right to a national existence in its homeland. Not only did this conduct divert the conference from its intended purpose, but it also subverted its potentially important work. Thankfully, at least a few national governments and non-governmental organizations maintained their sense of decency by rising to the defense of the Jewish people. Still, what has been lost in all of the antisemitic assaults is the gross hypocrisy and utter gall of the accusers, for the Arab record on race (and, for that matter, gender) issues, past and present, is among the worst in history.

Let's take slavery for starters. While parenthetical references are occasionally made to Arab slave traders in the context of assessments of Western slavery, particularly its American variant, the immense scope and savagery of the depredations inflicted by this group of "merchants" is usually a topic passed over in silence. Even less mention is made of the fact that, for many centuries, Arab society itself relied heavily on slave labor. Captured in seemingly endless raids, untold millions of Africans, Middle Easterners, and Europeans toiled away for their Arab "masters" under conditions of extreme cruelty -- conditions that typically exceeded the worst meted out by Western slave holders. Indeed, Arab slavery continues on a large scale to this very day, especially in the Sudan. No one knows for certain just how many hundreds of thousands of African Christians and animists have been sold into slavery to satisfy the labor needs of Arab Muslims -- and this on top of the millions of Africans who have been slaughtered or starved to death by Arabs in Sudan's never-ending civil war.

Now let's take a look at colonialism. Many people apparently think that this phenomenon didn't exist before the Western Europeans supposedly invented it. Not true! Arab imperialism began long before its Western European counterpart, and has continued to exist even after the latter has become nothing but a memory. One of the first acts of Arab colonialism, the truth be known, involved the destruction of the large and prosperous Jewish tribes of seventh-century Arabia, through massacres and expulsions, simply because they refused to accept Islam. …

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