Birth of Lord George Gordon December 26th, 1751

By Cavendish, Richard | History Today, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Birth of Lord George Gordon December 26th, 1751


Cavendish, Richard, History Today


The chiefs of the Gordons, Marquesses of Huntly and subsequently Dukes of Gordon, had a long and colourful history in Scotland. In the later eighteenth century they were considered possibly the greatest subjects in Britain, in terms of the number of people who lived under their rule and protection. Horace Walpole thought all of them were mad. Lord George Gordon, the youngest child of the 3rd duke, was born in London. Only seven months old when his father died, he was brought up by his widowed mother, herself a Gordon, on the family's vast estates in Scotland. He was sent to school at Eton and then into the Navy for a time before he became an MP. An erratic character, vain, emotional and prone to demagoguery and unexpected enthusiasms, he was scarcely known until the Protestant Associations were formed to campaign for repeal of the Catholic Relief Act of 1778, which diminished discrimination against Roman Catholics.

Lord George's own forebears had been Catholics for generations and he was no fanatic, but he had spoken out against the Relief Act in Scotland and the London Protestant Association chose him as its president. He seems to have accepted the position as a chance to shine as a leader of popular feeling. On June 2nd, 1780, he led a march of more than 50,000 people to the Houses of Parliament to present a monster petition. The demonstration set off an explosion of mob violence that lasted for days. To screams of `No Popery', Roman Catholics were attacked and their houses destroyed, and Roman Catholic chapels were smashed and looted.

Lord George and the respectable elements in the Association were horrified. They put a notice in the newspapers calling on `all true Protestants ... to shew their attachment to their best interests, by a legal and peaceable deportment.' This did nothing to stop the trouble, as the poor, who did not read the newspapers, came swarming out of the rookeries in St Giles, Spitalfields and Shoreditch to drink, loot and cause mayhem. There were murders and rapes, the Irish colony in Moorfields was attacked and hundreds of houses were burned down. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Birth of Lord George Gordon December 26th, 1751
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.