New and Noteworthy. (Reviews)

Contemporary Review, December 2001 | Go to article overview

New and Noteworthy. (Reviews)


Among autobiographies we have four new titles. The first, from ALLEN LANE: THE PENGUIN PRESS, is Paul Steinberg's Speak You Also: A Survivor's Reckoning ([pounds sterling]9.99). This moving account of a young Jewish student's life in Paris and of his time in Auschwitz, was first published in 1996. This is the U.S. translation published last year. The second new title is from YALE and is Aleksandr Nikitenko's Up from Serfdom: My Childhood and Youth in Russia, 1804-1824 ([pounds sterling]20.00). This is an extraordinary and rare insight into the life of Russia's serfs in the early nineteenth century. This translation is based on the 1904 St Petersburg edition and is founded on the notebooks Nikitenko kept between 1818 and 1824 when he won his freedom. The third, from ROBSON BOOKS, is Vignettes and Memories: Reflections from a Cambridge Drawing-Room ([pounds sterling]16.95) by Louis T. Stanley. Louis Stanley is a Cambridge man who went on to become a leading industrialist. After the Second World War he draughted the report, Germany After the War, which laid the blueprint for Allied reconstruction of the shattered country. His appeal lies, however, in his dinner-parties to which the famous, the interesting and the highly-paid were invited. Sportsmen mingled with politicians, actors with economists and holding the lists of famous people together are the author's own reflections on his long life. The fourth new autobiographical title comes from FABER & FABER and concerns Philip Larkin: Further Requirements. Interviews, Broadcasts, Statements and Book Reviews edited by his literary executor, the poet and critic, Anthony Thwaite ([pounds sterling]25.00). After a most useful introduction the text is divided into four: statements and interviews, broadcasts, forewords and lastly, reviews. This collection helps to round off the works of the late poet.

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS is well known for its 'Cambridge Companion' series in which the latest scholarship is gathered together to help students with chosen authors. Recently C.U.P. has released four new titles in both hardback ([pounds sterling]37.50 - US$54.95) and paperback ([pounds sterling]13.95 - US$19.95). The Cambridge Companion to George Eliot is edited by George Levine of Rutgers University. The eleven contributors, all but one of whom are from the U.S., discuss George Eliot's fiction, her interests in philosophy, science, politics and religion, her relations with her publishers, the critical heritage and the inevitable essay on 'gender'. The Cambridge Companion to D.H. Lawrence, edited by Anne Fernihough, is divided into two parts. In the first, 'texts', the eight essays discuss Lawrence's various novels, his poetry and dramatic output and his fight against 'racism'. In the second part, 'Contexts and Critical Issues', the six essays look at biographies of Lawrence, Lawrence and modernism, Lawren ce and the 'politics of sexual politics', Lawrence and psychoanalysis, Lawrence as an 'apocalyptist' and the body of critical writing on his work and life. The third volume is The Cambridge Companion to Keats, edited by Susan J. Wolfson. The contributors here, largely from U.S. universities, cover the whole spectrum of Keats' life and work: his early poetry, Endymion, Keats' relation with the 'Cockney School', his use of the ode and the epic, his letters, language and sources, his place in English literature, the critical essay and the obligatory essays on 'gender'. The fourth new release is The Cambridge Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald edited by Prof Ruth Prigozy. The essays discuss the rise of American youth culture, the 'question of vocation', Fitzgerald's short stories, the author's time in Europe, the role of women in his fiction, his non-fiction, his difficult relationship with Hollywood, his critical reputation and two novels: The Great Gatsby and Tender is the Night. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New and Noteworthy. (Reviews)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.