Martinez Must Save Property Rights from Antigrowth Elites. (Fair Comment)

By Marzulla, Nancie G. | Insight on the News, December 31, 2001 | Go to article overview

Martinez Must Save Property Rights from Antigrowth Elites. (Fair Comment)


Marzulla, Nancie G., Insight on the News


When Mel Martinez took the reins as the new secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), he had little reason to suspect that in addition to heading the nation's housing policies, he also would be handed the dubious distinction of being asked to unleash a 2,000-page blueprint for controlling every aspect of local land use across America from a "directorate" located in Washington.

Unless Martinez acts to stop it, in the next few days what benignly is dubbed the Legislative Guidebook will be jointly issued by HUD and the American Planning Association (APA). The guidebook is a comprehensive blueprint of model statutes and planning guidelines whose goal is nothing less than a centralization of land planning for state and local governments and elimination of the need for messy and "inefficient" local land-use control.

The Legislative Guidebook is the brainchild of an insular group of no-growth activists who found fertile soil for their antigrowth agenda at HUD during the Clinton administration. Flush with more than $1.7 million in HUD grant money, these activists (with the knowledge and input of only a select few) spent seven years crafting the guidebook.

Between July 1994 and June 2001, under the leadership of the HUD-APA "directorate" the project went through 11 amendments and expanded in nature and scope to the almost 2,000-page document it is today, filled with generic rhetoric that masks its true radical intent to federalize local government control and eviscerate constitutionally protected private-property rights. The general public, as well as minority- and small-business owners, farmers and virtually everyone affected by the guidelines, was excluded from the process.

Not surprisingly, then, the results of this exclusionary process is a product that is antibusiness and anti-private-property rights. Many provisions in the guidebook statutorily will take private-property rights without just compensation. One small example of the detailed level of control embodied in the guidebook is its treatment of ordinary commercial signs, which virtually every small business and restaurant has. After prescribing uniform size, shape and color standards by which every sign is required to look alike, the guidebook recommends an "amortization" plan, which will give small-business owners a limited period to enjoy their identical signs before they must be removed altogether, without payment of just compensation as required by the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Martinez Must Save Property Rights from Antigrowth Elites. (Fair Comment)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.