Weak Appetite in Elderly Ties to Hormone. (Science News of the Week)

By Seppa, N. | Science News, December 22, 2001 | Go to article overview
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Weak Appetite in Elderly Ties to Hormone. (Science News of the Week)


Seppa, N., Science News


A hormone known to suppress appetite is more abundant in seniors than in young adults and has a greater effect in squelching hunger in elderly people, scientists report. The findings suggest that counteracting this hormone--called cholecystokinin, or CCK--could help elderly people regain a healthy appetite and avoid anorexia, a condition of dangerous weight loss.

Various cells, notably those lining the entry to the small intestine, secrete CCK. Food settling into the lower stomach stimulates the intestinal cells to release the hormone, and CCK then activates the pancreas and gall bladder to produce digestive juices. This release and other CCK provided by nerve cells play a part in shutting off hunger signals. Studies show that giving animals extra CCK can inhibit appetite.

To look for this mechanism in people, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia monitored the diet of 12 elderly people and 12 young adults on three nonconsecutive days. These healthy participants fasted overnight and then ate meals prepared for them at a test facility. At each meal, the volunteers were offered more food than they could eat, says study coauthor John E. Morley, a geriatrician and endocrinologist at St. Louis University Health Sciences Center, who collaborated with the Australian team.

Before eating, the volunteers received an intravenous infusion that was either inert or contained a high or low dose of CCK. The scientists told them that their blood-hormone concentrations were being monitored and didn't emphasize the importance of food intake to the study.

Before the study began, the elderly group, average age 71, ate roughly 30 percent less than the young people, whose average age was 23.

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