Dialogue between Cultures for a Civilization of Love and Peace Message of His Holiness Pope John Paul II for the Celebration of the "World Day of Peace" January 1st, 2001

International Journal of Humanities and Peace, Annual 2001 | Go to article overview

Dialogue between Cultures for a Civilization of Love and Peace Message of His Holiness Pope John Paul II for the Celebration of the "World Day of Peace" January 1st, 2001


INDEX

Dialogue Between Cultures #1-3
Mankind and its Different Cultures #4-5
Human Development and being part of a
Culture #6-7
Cultural Differences and Mutual Respect
#8-9
Dialogue between Cultures #10
Possibilities and Risks of Global
Communication #11
The Challenge of Migration #12-13
Respect for Cultures #14-15
The Recognition of Shared Values #16
The Value of Solidarity #17
The Value of Peace #18
The Value of Life #19
The Value of Education #20
Forgiveness and Reconciliation #21
An Appeal to Young People #22
Notes

Dialogue Between Cultures for a Civilization of Love and Peace

1 At the dawn of a new millennium, there is growing hope that relationships between people will be increasingly inspired by the ideal of a truly universal brotherhood. Unless this ideal is shared, there will be no way to ensure a stable peace. There are many signs which suggest that this conviction is becoming more deeply rooted in people's minds. The importance of fraternity is proclaimed in the great "charters" of human rights; it is embodied in great international institutions, particularly the United Nations; and it is called for, as never before, by the process of globalization which is leading to a progressive unification of the economy, culture and society. For their part, the followers of the different religions are ever more conscious of the fact that a relationship with the one God, the common Father of all, cannot fail to bring about a greater sense of human brotherhood and a more fraternal life together. In God's revelation in Christ, this principle finds a radical expression: "He who does not love does not know God; for God is love" (1 Jn 4:8).

2 At the same time, however, it cannot be denied that thick clouds overshadow these bright hopes. Humanity is beginning this new chapter of its history with still open wounds. In many regions it is beset by bitter and bloody conflicts, and is struggling with increasing difficulty to maintain solidarity between people of different cultures and civilizations living together in the same territory. We all know how hard it is to settle differences between parties when ancient hatreds and serious problems, which admit of no easy solution, create an atmosphere of anger and exasperation. But no less dangerous for the future of peace would be the inability to confront intelligently the problems posed by a new social configuration resulting in many countries from accelerated migration and the unprecedented situation of people of different cultures and civilizations living side by side.

3 I therefore consider it urgent to invite believers in Christ, together with all men and women of good will, to reflect on the theme of dialogue between cultures and traditions. This dialogue is the obligatory path to the building of a reconciled world, a world able to look with serenity to its own future. This is a theme which is crucial to the pursuit of peace. I am pleased that the United Nations Organization has called attention to this urgent need by declaring 2001 the ?International Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations'. Naturally, I do not believe that there can be easy or readily applicable solutions to a problem like this. It is difficult enough to undertake an analysis of the situation, which is in constant flux and defies all preconceived models. There is also the difficulty of combining principles and values which, however reconcilable in the abstract, can prove on the practical level to be resistant to any easy synthesis. In addition, at a deeper level, there are always the demands which ethical commitment makes upon individuals, who are not free of self-interest and human limitations. But for this very reason I see the usefulness of a shared reflection on these issues. With this intention I confine myself here to offering some guidelines, listening to what the Spirit of God is saying to the Churches (cf. Rev 2:7) and to all of humanity at this decisive hour of its history. …

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