Grading the Media on Terrorism Coverage. (Your Life)

USA TODAY, January 2002 | Go to article overview

Grading the Media on Terrorism Coverage. (Your Life)


In the initial days following the Sept. 11 terrorist attack, media representatives did an excellent job covering "spot news," but now need to be careful to find middle ground in their reporting, say Steven Reese and Don Heider, journalism professors at the University of Texas at Austin. With the attacks in New York and Washington, D.C., there is a new factor that affects news coverage--the personal attack on American soil, Reese points out. "This raises the stakes and makes it even harder to entertain political views outside the narrow mainstream. The media `frame' of the events began to narrow quickly after the first week. Now, it is `America Fights Back' or `America Responds.' Combining this framing with the patriotism invoked by news organizations makes clear policy analysis more difficult."

Reese, co-author of The Militarism of Local Television: The Routine Framing of the Persian Gulf War, finds it particularly objectionable for a news organization like NBC to cast its peacock logo in red, white, and blue. "This is reminiscent of television news anchor desks literally wrapped in the American flag during the Gulf War."

Heider, who won five Emmys and an Edward R. Murrow Award for his work in television news in Nashville, Tenn., and teaches TV reporting at the university, agrees that some journalists are promoting patriotism, rather than covering it. "And, in some cases, some journalists are promoting cynicism rather than covering it. It's easy for news organizations--in these special times--to start crossing tines they might otherwise be careful of. Anchors with red, white, and blue ribbons on their lapels, reading news on news sets draped in the flag, can be seen as taking the position that we should be at war.

"Journalists also can get too cynical. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Grading the Media on Terrorism Coverage. (Your Life)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.