Would You Go out and Mix If You Risked a Good Kicking?

By Howe, Darcus | New Statesman (1996), January 14, 2002 | Go to article overview

Would You Go out and Mix If You Risked a Good Kicking?


Howe, Darcus, New Statesman (1996)


Last Monday, Oldham Council met to consider the results of the inquiry into last summer's street fighting in the town, involving 20,000 young men, mainly of Pakistani origin. The report has 134 recommendations. The last inquiry of that kind was the Macpherson report on the implications of the murder of Stephen Lawrence. That offered more than 170 recommendations. The Home Office promised to implement every one of them with the assistance of Stephen Lawrence's father and Lee Jasper, Ken Livingstone's adviser on race.

I am certain that neither Stephen's dad nor Jasper can answer, even for a million pounds, the question: what is Recommendation 121 of the Macpherson report? Nor, I think, could the councillors and bureaucrats of Oldham, even as they left their meeting, have told you what was proposed in, say, Recommendation 27 of the report on their town.

Why all these recommendations? The aim is to trap activists in a merry-go-round of decisions without significant actions. Far better to have just six recommendations that every child in Oldham could commit to memory. Far better to have a few simple aims so that, in five years' time, people can point at this or that building, to this or that social development, and say definitely whether or not anything has been achieved.

When I made White Tribe, a documentary for Channel 4, I travelled through Oldham to find out what white people thought of the state of race relations. I wrote in this column that I was witnessing apartheid and that it would not be long before a mad bout of violence descended upon the place. There was a stench of decay about the whites who lived in dilapidated council flats. The authorities in Oldham -- the same ones who now meet to consider the 134 recommendations -- could not come to terms with the truth. Every bureaucrat and his cousin signed a letter of protest to the NS. I was a troublemaker, they said, a mischief-maker who was trying to stir up the sensible people of Oldham.

And then came the avalanche. Young Pakistani men, who had been gerrymandered into cages in northern towns, exploded in a violent attempt to break out of their isolation.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Would You Go out and Mix If You Risked a Good Kicking?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.