Emerging Strategies in the Search for Effective University-Community Collaborations

By Walsh, David S. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, January 2002 | Go to article overview

Emerging Strategies in the Search for Effective University-Community Collaborations


Walsh, David S., JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Universities have come to realize and accept their responsibility to communities by collaborating with their neighboring schools and youth agencies (Benson, Harkavy, & Puckett, 11999). Although these university-community collaborations have taken place in areas such as math, science, and social studies, little attention has been given to the potential of physical-activity-based programs. Physical education is behind the times when it comes to forming university-community collaborations, but JOPERD has recently recognized the benefits of university-community collaborations in two articles promoting physical activity among adolescent girls (Ryan & Olasov, 2000; Watson, Poczwardowski, & Eisenman, 2000) and in articles connecting school physical education to the community (Cucina & McCormack, 2001; Cutforth, 2000).

Even though university-community collaborations often cost schools and youth agencies nothing, it can be difficult to get these institutions to provide the minimal support needed to create successful collaborations. Often these collaborations focus intensely on youth work but underestimate the importance of receiving necessary site support. Some of the difficulties and frustrations may include: administrators who fail to attend scheduled appointments, a lack of follow-through after a site commits to a collaboration, postponed starting dates, failure to hand out permission slips, poor youth-recruitment strategies, competition for use of reserved facilities by other programs, and program termination due to a site faculty's low regard for physical-activity-based programs. Certain sites are just not suitable for the attempted type of university-community collaboration. What are the signs that signal a poor site for collaboration? When is it time to leave a site? How does one maximize the chance of creating succe ssful long-term collaborations? These and similar questions require an examination of the subject of site support.

The Youth Leader Partnership

The Youth Leader Partnership (YLP) is a group of six physical education/kinesiology professors: Don Hellison, Nick Cutforth, James Kallusky, Tom Martinek, Melissa Parker, and Jim Stiehl. Although they work at six different universities in five states, they share a number of characteristics, including: (1) targeting children and youth who live in underserved communities; (2) developing, teaching in, and supervising extended day programs and in some cases, in-school programs; (3) capitalizing on the popularity of physical activity; (4) involving university students in their work; (5) engaging in applied research; and (6) using Don Hellison's (1995) personal and social responsibility model as their programs' focus. This group has accumulated a combined total of 70 years of direct experience with the development, implementation, and evaluation of physical-activity-based programs at schools and youth agencies (Hellison et al., 2000). This is the kind of experience that can provide insight into the various aspects of site support.

Based on several conversations, emails, and interviews with the YLP members, this article identifies four critical areas of site support and provides strategies for fostering each of them. The four site-support categories are contact people, policy, youth recruitment, and facilities.

Contact People

The first and most significant category for successful collaboration involves having two levels of contact people at a site. The first level is the initial contact person (ICP), who is an administrator (e.g., principal, vice principal, athletic director). The second level is the secondary contact person (SCP), who has direct contact with youths (e.g., teacher, counselor, coach).

Each of the YLP members described the importance of having an ICP to create a collaboration, develop a systematic way of recruiting youths, help secure facilities, and handle any other logistical aspect that requires administrative assistance.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Emerging Strategies in the Search for Effective University-Community Collaborations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.