Father of Starved Toddler to Get Psychological Tests

By Toomey, Shamus | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 31, 2002 | Go to article overview

Father of Starved Toddler to Get Psychological Tests


Toomey, Shamus, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Shamus Toomey Daily Herald Staff Writer

A judge Wednesday ordered a Streamwood man undergo psychological testing to determine if he was sane when his toddler starved to death because of neglect, authorities said.

The examination of Kristian Fredrickson's mental state came at the request of his public defender, Gary Stanton, who said Fredrickson's family has indicated the tests would be appropriate. He would not elaborate.

The exam is both a precursor to a potential insanity defense, Stanton said, and a way to determine if Fredrickson understood his rights when questioned by police. Prosecutors say Fredrickson waived his rights and confessed to the neglect.

Prosecutors also say his wife, Amanda, confessed to denying food and medical attention to their son. The 24-year-old high school sweethearts are charged with first-degree murder in the death of James Edward Fredrickson, who was 18 months old when he died Dec. 14.

Both Amanda and Kristian Fredrickson pleaded not guilty to the murder charges Wednesday at the Rolling Meadows Courthouse. The couple has been held in the Cook County jail's psychiatric ward since James' emaciated body was found in their Streamwood condominium. The boy weighed just one pound more in death than he did at birth.

The couple, wearing prison-issue clothes, did not appear to look at each other during their brief hearing Wednesday. …

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Father of Starved Toddler to Get Psychological Tests
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