On Mearth, Our Stars Aren't Cut out for Journalism. (Viewpoint)

By Hans, Dennis | National Catholic Reporter, January 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

On Mearth, Our Stars Aren't Cut out for Journalism. (Viewpoint)


Hans, Dennis, National Catholic Reporter


Just got back from Mearth, our sister planet on the other side of the Sun. Lovely place, virtually identical to Earth. Its version of the United States is remarkably like ours: A Texan is in the White House, Hollywood is a cesspool and the Boston Red Sox are cursed. Only one difference: Television journalism operates as a meritocracy.

Men and women are promoted based on their demonstrated ability to search out and carefully document unpleasant truths that powerful institutions -- governmental and corporate -- prefer to keep hidden, but that citizens must know about if they are to fulfill their civic duties in a genuinely democratic system.

No one gets promoted for looking great, dispensing feel-good puffery, keeping debates "inside the box" and dissenters out of the picture, toadying up to the powers that be and serving as their mouthpiece, or not knowing enough to pose tough questions or rebut dishonest ones.

Five days of channel-surfing on Mearth revealed identical show titles as on Earth, but none featured the same anchor or host. Mearth's MSNBC, for example, airs "Hardball," but loudmouth Chris Matthews was nowhere to be found. In the impatient bully's place was a tough but courteous black guy named Les Payne, whose earthly counterpart is a standout print journalist at New York's Newsday.

I didn't recognize the flesh face who hosted Mearth's "Meet the Press." Like Tim Russert, Maria Gonzales was persistent. But instead of goading guest Colin Powell into a commitment to invade Mearth's Iraq, she grilled him on the human toll U.S.-backed economic sanctions had exacted on the innocent Iraqi civilian population. Talk about out of the box!

Dave Marash, who on Earth is an underrated, underutilized correspondent for "Nightline," anchored the Mearth version of the ABC show. I managed to reach him after a Mearth "Nightline" that exposed a long-running White House disinformation campaign to downplay the U.S.-backed Colombian army's indispensable role in facilitating the terrorism of right-wing death squads.

"Where is Ted Koppel?" I asked. Marash said ABC let him go back in 1975, after a string of reports -- based on cozy chats with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger -- that downplayed CIA collaboration with South Africa in Angola. "Ted simply wasn't cut out for independent journalism," said Marash. "Last I heard, he was PR director for Kissinger & Associates. …

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