GOP Senate Hopefuls Differ on Terrorism Spending

By Krol, Eric | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 10, 2002 | Go to article overview

GOP Senate Hopefuls Differ on Terrorism Spending


Krol, Eric, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Eric Krol Daily Herald Political Writer

The Bush administration dropped strong hints last week about a possible invasion of Iraq to stop the country from developing nuclear weapons.

The three candidates seeking the Illinois Republican nomination for U.S. Senate all would support such a move - provided the United State can't resolve the situation diplomatically - as part of an expansion of the war against terrorism.

While state Rep. Jim Durkin, financial manager James Oberweis and businessman John Cox agree on Iraq, they have different ideas about where the country should be spending its money at home to defend the country against terrorist attacks.

Durkin called for more federal money for the nation's "front line soldiers" in the war on terrorism: police, fire and public works departments.

"The front lines are not on Normandy and across the seas," said Durkin, a former prosecutor from Westchester. "There's a massive task ahead for law enforcement."

Federal money should take the form of training grants so local authorities can detect and respond to terrorist attacks, Durkin said. He also called for the federal Centers for Disease Control to come up with an early warning system for state and local health departments on what to do if a bioterrorist attack takes place.

Oberweis said the nation must spend more money on military intelligence, allowing CIA and other operatives to gather important information on terrorists.

"As an entrepreneur and a chess player, I think it's important that we try to think ahead and anticipate events before they occur," said Oberweis, an Aurora resident who owns a dairy business that bears his name.

When asked to say where he would spend money to combat terrorism, Cox called for a change in the way the United States doles out foreign aid. Cox questioned continued foreign aid to Saudi Arabia, saying many terrorists wanted by the United States have spent time there. Pakistan, on the other hand, has tried to help the United States and deserves more aid, Cox said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

GOP Senate Hopefuls Differ on Terrorism Spending
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.