Crime Blotter: A Snapshots of Crime Statistics by Gender and Race/ethnicity, along with a Look at Occupations and Salaries in the American Criminal Justice System

Black Issues in Higher Education, January 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

Crime Blotter: A Snapshots of Crime Statistics by Gender and Race/ethnicity, along with a Look at Occupations and Salaries in the American Criminal Justice System


African American Proportion of Youth Offenders, 1998 *

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

Action Taken

Arrested                            26%
Referred to Juvenile Court          31%
Detained                            44%
Petitioned by Juvenile Court        34%
Adjudicated Delinquent              32%
Waived to Criminal Court            46%
In Residential Placement            40%
Admitted to State Prisons           58%

* DATA REPRESENTS OFFENDERS

SOURCE: AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION AND NATIONAL BAR ASSOCIATION --
"JUSTICE BY GENDER -- THE LACK OF APPROPRIATE PREVENTION, DIVERSION
AND TREATMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR GIRLS IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM."
Percentage of Jail Inmates by Race/Ethnicity, 1990-2000

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

                       1990   1991   1992   1993   1994   1995

White, non-Hispanic    41.8   41.1   40.1   39.3   39.1   40.1
Black, non-Hispanic    42.5   43.4   44.1   44.2   43.9   43.5
Hispanic               14.3   14.2   14.5   15.1   15.4   14.7
Other *                 1.3    1.2    1.3    1.3    1.6    1.7

                       1996   1997   1998   1999   2000

White, non-Hispanic    41.6   40.6   41.3   41.3   41.9
Black, non-Hispanic    41.1   42.0   41.2   41.5   42.3
Hispanic               15.6   15.7   15.5   15.5   15.1
Other *                 1.7    1.8    2.0    1.7    1.6

* Includes American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian, and Pacific
Islanders.

SOURCE: U.S DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE -- BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS
Inmates in State, Federal, and Local Jails by Age as of June 30, 2000

                                     MALE

                              White          Black
     Age         Total *    Non-Hispanic   Non-Hispanic    Hispanic

      Total     1,775,700     663,700        791,600       290,900
      18-19        81,300      26,200         36,700        15,600
      20-24       310,100      99,500        142,800        60,000
      25-29       329,900     104,900        160,200        58,400
      30-34       334,000     125,000        149,700        54,800
      35-39       294,100     116,200        136,100        39,600
      40-44       198,300      81,300         83,400        31,200
      45-54       164,500      77,900         62,200        22,200
55 or older        51,300      29,500         13,300         7,800

                                    FEMALE

                              White          Black
    Age        Total *     Non-Hispanic   Non-Hispanic   Hispanic

      Total     156,200        63,700         69,500       19,500
      18-19       3,900         1,900          1,400          500
      20-24      19,600         8,300          7,400        3,500
      25-29      30,000        11,200         13,500        4,000
      30-34      39,100        15,000         19,400        4,100
      35-39      30,700        12,500         14,400        3,300
      40-44      17,000         7,200          7,500        1,900
      45-54      12,100         5,600          4,500        1,700
55 or older       2,700         1,800            800          200
Top 10 Occupations & Salaries for Those With Bachelor's
Degrees in Criminal Justice and Criminology, 1997
                                                             Annual
Rank   Occupation                                            Salary

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