Wether Climate, and Global Warming: A Web Review

By Keiser, Barbie E. | Searcher, February 2002 | Go to article overview

Wether Climate, and Global Warming: A Web Review


Keiser, Barbie E., Searcher


Many of us now use the weather sites available on the Internet to check out weather conditions in a city to which we plan to travel or where other members of our extended family reside. When inclement weather comes upon us and storm warnings are posted, some of these sites do a better job in terms of tracking the situation than others.

News organizations (print newspapers or television broadcast stations) are an excellent source of information concerning current weather and forecasts, providing local, national, and even international data. Whether your favorite newspaper is the New York Times [http://www.nytimes.com/weather], the LA Times [http://www.weatherpoint.com/latimes] or a local paper, you cannot go very wrong checking weather reports on these Web sites. Also, don't forget that local TV news shows have Web sites that include "today's weather" and forecasts, too:

* CNN Weather's home page [http://www.cnn.com/weather] features weather images covering the regions of the U.S. and other continents. Five-day forecasts are available by state or ZIP code, or click on a region of the world.

* USA Today Weather [http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wfront.htm] expands the weather section in its print product with a convenient database of forecasts by locality (country, state, or ZIP code within the U.S.). There are several Main Categories which link to separate Web pages (Weather Briefs, Cold Science, Weather Basics, Hurricanes, Severe Storms, and Almanac). More Weather deals with the week ahead, weather extremes, weather safety, travel forecasts, energy index, ski guide, city guides, beach weather, and "weather talk."

* The Weather Channel [http://www.weather.com] began as a cable television outlet and now provides a very crisp, clean Web site containing a map of the USA on its home page and fore- casts of weather 10 days out, region by region. The section concerning Seasonal Links can help during hurricane season, as it monitors the track of storms in each ocean.

While live satellite feeds and graphic radar images can sometimes be slow to load, they are useful tools when watching for inclement weather and incoming storm situations. Among the best of those featuring real-time images are Live Weather Images [http://weather.images.orgl and the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) Project Science [http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/ goes] with satellite pictures collected by NASA. GOES pictures of clouds are used by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service to track severe storms (such as hurricanes) as the storms develop over the ocean. In fact, the GOES pictures are the images used by television weather broadcasters. Billed as the Latest Cool Image from the U.S. Storm Prediction Center [http://www.spc. noaa.gov/coolimg], you can view past "cool images" as well.

The atmospheric science departments at academic institutions often do an excellent job in dealing with weather-related issues. The Plymouth State College Weather Center [http://vortex.plymouth.edu] features a weather map of the U.S. (click on a locality to get the forecast). Its interactive maps and logs include climate summaries and images of tropical storms. Tutorials, past weather (summary temperature charts), current weather (sea surface temperatures, satellite and radar images), forecast weather (temperature and precipitation), and historical events (such as the Northeast blizzard of 1993) appear on the site as well. UM World of Weather [http://cirrus.sprl.umich.edu/wxnet] provides access to thousands of forecasts, images, plus nearly 300 weather links.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is the logical place to go for weather information. Its site is so rich, that it's difficult to identify the most important pages:

* NOAA Home Page [http://www.noaa.gov] serves as an introduction to weather, featuring stories concerning current weather activity and news.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wether Climate, and Global Warming: A Web Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.