10 Most Unforgettable Black Women; Commanding Presence and Natural Talent Make These Great Leaders Memorable

By Norment, Lynn | Ebony, February 1990 | Go to article overview

10 Most Unforgettable Black Women; Commanding Presence and Natural Talent Make These Great Leaders Memorable


Norment, Lynn, Ebony


10 Most Unforgettable Black Women

THERE comes a time in life when you cross paths with an individual who is truly unforgettable. It could be good looks or a fine physique that captures your interest. Or it could be pure talent, political savvy or stimulating intellect. That unforgettable quality could be style and personality.

Throughout our history, there have been Black women who have left their marks indelibly etched in the hearts and minds of America and the world. Though they were smart, talented women, that special something that made them memorable transcended their fields of expertise. It was personal charisma and electric personality that made them linger in one's consciousness. Once you met them, you could never forget them.

It is said that Mary McLeod Bethune was not what the world calls beautiful, but she had so much presence and so much inner beauty that when she walked into a room, people stood up and gave her respect. President Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt frequently sought her advice. Unforgettable is also a most appropriate adjective for the bedazzling Josephine Baker, the one-woman extravaganza who enraptured Paris and the world in the 1920s. It is also a fitting description of one of Baker's show business contemporaries, Ethel Waters, who started out on the blues circuit and evolved into one of Broadway's most popular Black performers. Madame C. J. Walker was quite a dynamic woman, having made a fortune with the hot-iron method of straightening hair. And Ida B. Wells will forever be remembered as the journalist who crusaded against racism.

On these pages EBONY presents "10 Unforgettable Black Women" who have had a significant impact on Black America. Whether their contributions were in the arts and literature, entertainment, or in civil and human rights, they, in their own unforgettable way, enriched the lives of their contemporaries as well as those who follow.

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) was indeed a great American woman, having elevated her status from a cotton picker in South Carolina to confidante and advisor to presidents and founder of Bethune-Cookman College. The talented and flamboyant Josephine Baker (1906-1975), originally from St. Louis, enthralled Paris with her sizzling performances and became an internationally famous entertainer.

Madame C. J. Walker (1867-1919) was the first Black businesswoman millionaire, having made her fortune by developing the hot comb hair straightening process. Starting as a washerwoman in St. Louis, she used business skills and hard work to train thousands of agents to distribute her hair-care and beauty products nationwide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

10 Most Unforgettable Black Women; Commanding Presence and Natural Talent Make These Great Leaders Memorable
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.