California Is Rewriting the Constitution; Why It Must Say No to Subsized Education for Illegal Immigrants

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

California Is Rewriting the Constitution; Why It Must Say No to Subsized Education for Illegal Immigrants


Byline: Ward Connerly, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

My sense of fairness was shaped by my Uncle James, the man who raised me after my grandmother and I moved to California in the late 1940s. Uncle James made most of his important decisions in life based on what a college professor of mine, Robert Thompson, called his "knower." A "knower" is that part of your psyche that just knows what is right and what is wrong. All of us have one, but sometimes we choose to ignore what it is telling us.

And it seems to me that California Gov. Gray Davis, members of the California legislature, and the regents of the University of California (UC) system, are ignoring their knowers over the issue of college tuition breaks for illegal aliens.

Here's what's happened: Guided by a desire to give "equitable treatment" to the sons and daughters of illegal immigrants, on the rationale that children should not be held responsible for the conduct of their parents, the regents voted 17-5 (with yours truly being in the minority of that vote) to charge illegal immigrants less to attend California public universities than U.S. citizens who live in, say, Phoenix or Denver. The requirements to qualify for this subsidy are that the student must have attended a California high school for three years, graduated from high school, and file an affidavit declaring intent to seek American citizenship.

That's right. Every citizen living legally in the other 49 states will be charged a higher tuition rate in California than illegal immigrants who happen to be in California. My knower knows this is just flat wrong.

As a regent of the UC system, I know that the citizens of my state, as well as federal taxpayers, subsidize each graduate and undergraduate student's tuition to the tune of thousands of dollars each year. That is a price California citizens, largely, must pay in state taxes to ensure a top-notch university system - one that is envied throughout the country. California residents pay $3,859 in yearly tuition to attend UC, while out-of-state students pay nearly $15,000 for the same education.

I am not unsympathetic to the millions of individuals throughout the world who want to come to California to earn a decent living and pursue opportunity and freedom. But, our federal laws are crystal clear about illegal immigration. These laws should not be cavalierly ignored or even given a big wink. It is wrong to confer a benefit on illegal residents that we do not confer on our own citizens. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

California Is Rewriting the Constitution; Why It Must Say No to Subsized Education for Illegal Immigrants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.