Globe Gets to Grips with Books; LITERACY: Schools Set to Take Part in Largest Ever Celebration of Written Word

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), March 8, 2002 | Go to article overview

Globe Gets to Grips with Books; LITERACY: Schools Set to Take Part in Largest Ever Celebration of Written Word


Byline: RHODRI EVANS

YOUNGSTERS at Blaenporth Primary School, Ceredigion, are proving reading in a foreign language can be fun.

School activities will be take on a distinctly French flavour next week when the students celebrate World Book Day on Thursday, March 14.

School head Ann Williams has arranged a day-long programme of events from snail-sampling to singing French songs as well as reading books from countries across Europe.

Blaenporth is just one of hundreds of schools throughout Wales joining in the celebration, organised and promoted in Wales by the Welsh Books Council.

The pupils will be dipping into the European Picture Books Collection, designed to help students find out more about their European neighbours.

It was set up using EU grant funding and created by people working in the fields of children's literature and education.

The collection is made up of 20 books in different languages; two CDs of the stories in their original languages and a teachers' resource book.

Ann Williams said, "I believe it is important that children are interested in and develop closer links with Europe.

"In particular we have close ties with Brittany and by giving children a fun introduction to the language through the picture books and different activities I hope they will want to carry on and learn more."

The school's French Day is just one event in Wales's biggest ever celebration of books and reading throughout on World Book Day.

Thousands of people of all ages will be joining in hundreds of different events across the country.

Everyone from TV personalities to leading academics are joining in the celebration of the written word.

In high streets across Wales, posters promoting the day are being put up and special book day pages have been created on a web site which can be found at www. wbc. org. uk.

There will be a series of readings on radio and television, as well as special features in The Western Mail.

Two new poems, one in English and one in Welsh, have been specially commissioned as the centrepiece for an all-Wales radio recitation.

The recitation will take place on Radio Wales between 10.30am and 10.45am and on Radio Cymru at 11.10am.

In Ceredigion a special display is being put on at the Town Library whilst at Penweddig School four authors will be reading their work to pupils, with other local schools invited to attend. …

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Globe Gets to Grips with Books; LITERACY: Schools Set to Take Part in Largest Ever Celebration of Written Word
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