Spy Agencies Say Pilot Likely Seized; Navy Flier Disappeared in Iraq during Persian Gulf War

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Spy Agencies Say Pilot Likely Seized; Navy Flier Disappeared in Iraq during Persian Gulf War


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A U.S. intelligence report on the case of Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher provides the most complete explanation by the U.S. government on why the pilot probably was captured alive by Iraqis after ejecting from his F-18 in 1991.

"We assess Lt. Cmdr. Speicher was either captured alive or his remains were recovered and brought to Baghdad," said the report, "Intelligence Community Assessment of Lieutenant Commander Speicher Case."

A six-page unclassified summary of the report - based on CIA and Defense Intelligence Agency data - states that Cmdr. Speicher "probably survived" the loss of his aircraft, and if he survived, he almost certainly was captured by the Iraqis.

The report was produced at the request of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee, and a note stated that the unclassified version is "incomplete" because secret data was omitted.

The Navy F-18 pilot disappeared Jan. 17, 1991, the first night of the Persian Gulf war. He was the only U.S. serviceman lost over land during the war, and he was classified "killed-in-action, body not recovered" until last year.

On Jan. 11, 2001, his status was changed to missing in action.

President Bush said on Wednesday that Cmdr. Speicher could be alive and expressed disgust at Saddam Hussein, "who would be so cold and heartless as to hold an American flier for all this period of time without notification to his family."

The intelligence report is dated March 27, 2001, but its contents were not disclosed until Monday, after a copy was obtained by The Washington Times.

U.S. intelligence officials told The Times that they had obtained new information in the past several months since the report was issued indicating that Cmdr. Speicher is being held in Iraq.

According to the intelligence report, all coalition airmen were accounted for at the end of the Gulf war except for Cmdr. Speicher and a Saudi Arabian pilot.

Suspicions about his fate were raised in 1991 when Baghdad gave the United States a small amount of human remains it identified as part of a pilot named "Mickel." Laboratory analysis revealed the remains were "human, but not those of Lt. Cmdr. Speicher," the report said.

Afterward, the Iraqi government said the pilot was "devoured by animals and that no remains were found," the report said.

The F-18 initially was thought to have blown up in flight. But in 1993, U.S. intelligence was informed that Cmdr. Speicher's downed F-18 was located in southwestern Iraq, and two years later a U-2 spy aircraft photographed the site.

A team of investigators, working with the International Committee of the Red Cross, visited the site in December 1995 and found that the area had "been expertly searched within a month prior to the team's arrival" by the Iraqis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Spy Agencies Say Pilot Likely Seized; Navy Flier Disappeared in Iraq during Persian Gulf War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.