False Child-Abuse Charges Still Haunt Bay State. (Fair Comment)

By Roberts, Paul Craig | Insight on the News, March 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

False Child-Abuse Charges Still Haunt Bay State. (Fair Comment)


Roberts, Paul Craig, Insight on the News


Massachusetts Republican Gov. Jane Swift should be tarred, feathered and then run out of the Bay State. She refused the unanimous recommendation of the Governor's Board of Pardons to free an innocent man because she is afraid of a political backlash in her re-election campaign.

Aren't the citizens of Massachusetts lucky to have a governor who refuses to allow basic issues such as justice to get in the way of narrow calculations of her self-interest? Politicians are fakes, but isn't Swift laying it on too thick? How can we even pretend to respect public officials when Swift intentionally keeps an innocent man in jail simply because she is afraid to offend the evil people who framed him?

In its lead editorial on Feb. 21, the Wall Street Journal gave Swift the contempt she has earned: "She joins the long line of the ambitious and the self-seeking prosecutors and politicians who chose expediency over justice." Massachusetts has Harvard, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and lots of liberals. With liberal credentials all about them, people in the state think of themselves as sophisticated. But the truth is that when it comes to justice and frame-ups, Massachusetts has made no progress since the Salem witch trials in the 17th century.

Gerald Amirault was flamed along with his sister and mother 16 years ago on fabricated child sex-abuse charges by an ambitious prosecutor who used the name recognition he gained to run successfully for state attorney general and unsuccessfully for governor. Among unbelievable and absurd charges, he accused the Amiraults of raping children in their day-care center with butcher knives.

Everyone who has read the charges on which the Amiraults were convicted recognizes that they are far less believable than the accusations at the Salem witch trials three centuries earlier. Massachusetts might have some sophisticated people, but none of them were on the jury.

State judges finally pried Amirault's sister and mother (now deceased) from the clenched claws of Massachusetts' despicable prosecutors, who go to far greater lengths to keep innocent people in jail (so as not to have to admit a mistake) than to put guilty ones there. …

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