'Cyber-Psychiatry' May Redefine the Physician-Patient Relationship. (Medicolegal Limbo)

By Sherman, Carl | Clinical Psychiatry News, March 2002 | Go to article overview

'Cyber-Psychiatry' May Redefine the Physician-Patient Relationship. (Medicolegal Limbo)


Sherman, Carl, Clinical Psychiatry News


BOSTON -- Although the legal and ethical implications of technologic innovations in psychiatry have yet to be defined in any detail, they are expected to evolve largely within the confines of the classic physician-patient relationship, Dr. Peter Ash said at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

But the most intimate interface of technology and clinical practice--online therapy, or "cyber-psychiatry"--may necessitate redefining the relationship that carries with it different duties, responsibilities, and liabilities, said Dr. Ash of Emory University, Atlanta.

Although electronic technology has made inroads into medicine in general and psychiatry in particular, the profession as a whole has made little accommodation. "The field takes a conservative position, but it can't stand.... We're hanging on by our fingernails," he said. "Once the technology is there, people will use it."

While laws and guidelines characteristically lag behind technology, and legal rulings have been sparse, it seems likely that the physician-patient relationship will be a central concern.

For example, although the issue has yet to be decided by the courts, a physician might well be at legal risk for material on his Web site despite an unambiguous disclaimer, if it were determined that a physician-patient relationship had been established. Supporting cases suggest that contract liability may be extended to a physician who performs a medical service and receives a fee, even though the parties have never met, Dr. Ash said.

Generally, the law tries to expand the standard physician-patient relationship to embrace practice innovations, an approach that seems apt for most electronic applications. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Cyber-Psychiatry' May Redefine the Physician-Patient Relationship. (Medicolegal Limbo)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.